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CHANGES TO SUNDAY DANCING LAWS BY CHRISTMAS

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Dancers desperate to trip the light fantastic on a Sunday will be able to take to the ballroom or disco legally for...
Dancers desperate to trip the light fantastic on a Sunday will be able to take to the ballroom or disco legally for the first time in more than 200 years.

Home Office minister Michael Forsyth hopes to have changes to the Sunday dancing laws in place for Christmas and New Year's Eve as they fall on a Sunday this year.

Young and old will benefit from changes to the outdated Sunday Observance Act 1780. It will allow charging for public dancing on Sundays including discos and tea dances.

A consultation document published today asks for comments on charging for discos and dances on a Sunday and a proposal to extend licensing hours on a Sunday to allow alcohol to be sold there.

Mr Forsyth said: 'It is time to strip away this outdated restriction and allow people the opportunity to go to discos or dances on a Sunday.

'We would aim to have the changes in place by the end of the year as Christmas and New Year's Eve fall on a Sunday.'

Comments on the proposals are requested by 26 May 1995. Any legislative changes will be made under the Deregulation and Contracting Out Act 1994.

The Act 1994 provides a power to remove or reduce certain statutory burdens on businesses or individuals so long as necessary protection is not reduced.

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