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'DISABLED STILL EXCLUDED'

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New research has revealed that people with disabilities wanting to work still face obstacles both at application an...
New research has revealed that people with disabilities wanting to work still face obstacles both at application and interview stage.

Of 200 senior directors interviewed, one in three said they felt the majority of employers, when considering two candidates of equal experience, would opt for an able bodied candidate over a disabled applicant.

The report from UnumProvident, the UK's leading disability insurer, highlights key misconceptions held by employers, including:

* A fear that disabled employees could have worse absenteeism records than their able bodied counterparts

* Disabled employees are more of a legal risk

* Disabled workers may require costly specialist equipment (for which grants are available)

Joanne Hindle from UnumProvident said:

'We estimate there are some 750,000 disabled people in the UK who want to work and who could be helped in their search for employment and thereby given greater independence over their lives. However, one of the obstacles to achieving this are the many misconceptions employers have about employing them.

'36% of employers complain of staff shortages. By helping 250,000 disabled people back to work, we estimate the government could save around£1.1bn a year in incapacity benefits and generate around£1.2billion in income tax and national insurance.'

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