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DISADVANTAGED HOUSEHOLDS - RESULTS FROM THE 2000 GENERAL HOUSEHOLD SURVEY

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Households who were dependent on state benefits and those comprising...
Households who were dependent on state benefits and those comprising

lone parents with dependent children were among the households most

likely to be disadvantaged, according to an analysis published today

by the Office for National Statistics. For lone parents this was

particularly apparent when compared with households comprising a

couple with dependent children.

This report, issued as a supplement to the main General Household

Survey publication, Living in Britain 2000, presents an overview of

the circumstances, in terms of the material, economic and social

resources, of different types of disadvantaged households. These

include households such as those dependent on state benefits,

workless households, those where all adults had a long term health

problem and lone parents.

These households and the people within them fared less well than

others across a range of key social indicators. Their disadvantage

compared with the general population was particularly marked in

relation to level of household income and access to a car. For

example:

- Sixty-eight per cent of households dependent on benefits and 57 per

cent of households where all adults had a long term health problem,

did not have access to a car compared with 27 per cent of

households overall.

- Disadvantaged households were less likely to own their homes. Two

thirds of households overall (68 per cent) lived in owner occupied

accommodation compared with 35 per cent of workless households, 34

per cent of lone parent households and 25 per cent of households

dependent on state benefits.

*Disadvantaged households. Results from the 2000 General Household

Survey - Supplement A.

Available free on the National Statistics website.

- Access to home computers and the internet was low among most types

of disadvantaged households. For example, 16 per cent of households

dependent on state benefits owned a computer compared with 45 per

cent for the overall population.

- Compared with couples with dependent children, lone parents were

less likely to have access to a home computer (45 per cent compared

with 73 per cent) or the internet (27 per cent compared with 54 per

cent).

- People living in disadvantaged households were also more likely to

have health problems: 48 per cent of those in households dependent

on state benefits had a limiting long standing illness compared

with 21 per cent overall.

- In terms of social resources, people in disadvantaged households

tended to have fewer people they could look to for support. Thirty

per cent of those in households dependent on benefits, 28 per cent

in workless households and 26 per cent of lone parents had less

than three people they could turn to in a crisis, compared with 18

per cent of the general population.

- Neighbourliness tended to be lower among disadvantaged households.

Forty-two per cent of those in benefit households and 43 per cent

of lone parents gave and received favours from neighbours compared

with 53 per cent overall.

- People in disadvantaged households were less likely to feel safe

walking alone after dark. Around a third of those in benefit

households (36 per cent) and 46 per cent of those in workless

households felt safe compared with more than half (55 per cent) of

the general population.

BACKGROUND NOTES

1. This supplementary report focused on the households defined as

disadvantaged using the following criteria: workless households

(households containing at least one person of working age, but no-one

in paid employment); households in which state benefits provide the

only source of income; lower income households (gross weekly

household income of£250 or less); households in which all adults are

aged 60 or more (referred to as 60 plus households); households in

which all adults have a long-term health problem; households with no

adults born in Britain; households comprising one person; households

comprising a lone parent with dependent children (children aged less

than 16 or aged 16 to 18 in full time education).

2. The social indicators included: housing tenure, car ownership and

other consumer measures, income, the socio-economic group of the

household reference person, health, health behaviour and the

education level of individuals in disadvantaged households and some

indicators of social capital included for the first time in the GHS

in 2000.

3. Data presented in this supplementary report are weighted to

compensate for differential non-response.

4. The full results from the 2000 General Household Survey can be

found in Living in Britain. Results from the 2000 General Household

Survey, first published on 11 December 2001. It is available on the

National Statistics website: www.statistics.gov.uk/lib. Results

relating to social capital data can be found in People's perceptions

of their neighbourhood and community involvement published on 19 June

2002. It is available on the National Statistics website:

www.statistics.gov.uk/downloads/theme_social/

Peoples_perceptions_social_capital.pdf

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