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FAMILY FOOD 2002-03

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Today DEFRA publishes its annual report 'Family Food 2002-03', a ...
Today DEFRA publishes its annual report 'Family Food 2002-03', a

report on the 2002-03 Expenditure and Food Survey. The report

includes estimates of food consumption and energy and nutrition

intakes per person in the UK with regional and demographic analyses.

http://statistics.defra.gov.uk/esg/publications/efs/2003/default.asp

Headline results for the UK were published on 24 June 2004.

http://statistics.defra.gov.uk/esg/statnot/efsuk.pdf

Extended tables are provided in Excel datasets at:

http://statistics.defra.gov.uk/esg/publications/efs/datasets/default.asp

Associated information including past reports can be found on the

Family Food page of the Defra statistics website at:

http://statistics.defra.gov.uk/esg/publications/efs/default.asp

The 87 page report includes trends in household food consumption and

its nutritional value since 1975 and detailed estimates of household

food expenditure, consumption and intakes in 2002-03. It includes

estimates of food eaten out and its nutritional value in 2001-02 and

2002-03 and has chapters on regional and demographic comparisons.

The following information is taken from the report:

The headline results, based on household purchases in 2002-03, show

that

* Fresh fruit consumption is 5.8 per cent higher than in 2001-02 and

has risen by over 50 per cent since 1975.

* Fresh potato consumption is 4.6 per cent lower than in 2001-02 and

has fallen by over 50 per cent since 1975.

* Average energy intake from all food and drink remained the same in

2002-03 at an average of 2301 Kcals per person per day, but there is

a downward trend since 1964 in energy intake from household

consumption.

and based on household purchases plus eating out in 2002-03 that

* The percentage of energy derived from fat, excluding energy from

alcohol, is slightly lower than in the previous year at 37.6 per cent

in 2002-03, but this level is still above the recommended level of 35

per cent.

* The percentage of energy derived from saturated fatty acids,

excluding energy from alcohol, is slightly lower at 14.7 per cent in

2002-03, but this level is still above the recommended level of 11

per cent.

Country comparisons show that in 2002-03

* Home consumption of fruit and vegetables (excluding potatoes)

remains highest in England and lowest in Northern Ireland.

* Scotland households continue to have the highest consumption of

soft drinks.

Regions of England comparisons show that in 2002-03

* Vegetable (excluding potatoes) and fruit consumption is highest in

the East and South West respectively with the lowest consumption

levels for both vegetables and fruit being recorded in the North

East.

* Levels of eating out are highest in London where more than twice as

many Indian, Chinese and ethnic-type meals are consumed than in the

East Midlands.

* Eating out expenditure as a percentage of overall food and drink

spending is 38.4% in London compared to 28.2% in the South West.

* Energy intake and the intakes of most nutrients are lowest in

London.

Demographic comparisons show that in 2002-03

* Households in the highest income quintile have the highest home

consumption of cheese, vegetables (excluding potatoes), fruit and

alcoholic drinks and the lowest consumption of milk and cream, fats,

sugar, potatoes, cereals, beverages and confectionery.

* The percentage of energy derived from total fat, saturated and

monounsaturated fatty acids, and carbohydrate is higher in the lower

income groups.

* Intake of alcohol increases as income rises.

* Intakes of energy and most nutrients are highest in households

classified as 'White'.

* The 'Higher professional' households consume most cheese, fish,

vegetables (excluding potatoes), fruit and alcoholic drinks.

Notes

1) Family Food 2002-03 is available in hard copy from The Stationery

Office.

2) Estimates for 2001-02 and 2002-03 are from the Expenditure and

Food Survey (the survey year runs from 1 April until 31 March).

Historical estimates back to 1974 are adjusted estimates from the

National Food Survey.

3) Estimates of consumption and nutrition of food and drink eaten out

in 2001-02 and 2002-03 are published for the first time. In 2001-02

the National Food Survey was replaced by the Expenditure and Food

Survey. At the same time coverage was extended to include food and

drink eaten out. Limited estimates of food eaten out are available

from the National Food Survey back to 1994.

4) Estimates of household food consumption from 1974 to 2000 based on

the National Food Survey have been revised to the level of estimates

from the Family Expenditure Survey in 2000, which are broadly

comparable with estimates from the Expenditure and Food Survey in

2001-02. Whilst estimates of household consumption from the National

Food Survey have been adjusted a break in the series in 2001-02

remains.

5) The Expenditure and Food Survey is a great improvement on the

National Food Survey in terms of under-reporting. Firstly, as

opposed to one diary for the household, everyone aged seven and over

completes a diary of everything they spend. Secondly, because the

primary objective of the survey is to collect expenditure and not

dietary consumption there is less temptation to under-report snacks.

Thirdly the diary is simpler since it has the principle of recording

only what you buy.

6) Household consumption as measured by the National Food Survey and

the Expenditure and Food Survey includes food and drink purchased and

brought into the home. It is measured in the form it is purchased,

for example, eggs purchased and later used to make a cake will be

recorded under eggs and not under cakes. However, if a ready-made

cake is purchased, it is recorded under cakes. For consumption, no

adjustment is made for non-edible parts of food items such as skins,

peels and bones nor for other food waste.

7) Free food such as school meals and work provided meals and snacks

are not included in the Expenditure and Food Survey results.

Occurrences of these are recorded in the survey and estimates of

consumption will be made for future reports.

8) In 1996 the National Food Survey was extended to cover Northern

Ireland - prior to 1996 the quoted averages relate to Great Britain

only but generally this makes little difference.

9) Defra acts on behalf of the Scottish Executive and the National

Assembly for Wales in commissioning (jointly with the Office for

National Statistics), the collection of data from households. The

Department of Agriculture and Rural Development in Northern Ireland

commissions its own data collection and issues its own press releases

and annual report.

10) The Food Standards Agency works closely with Defra, providing

invaluable advice and information on methodology and nutritional

aspects of the survey.

11) All tables, many with fuller details, can be found free of charge

on the Family Food page of the statistics section of the Defra

website at:

http://statistics.defra.gov.uk/esg/publications/efs/default.asp

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