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GOOD POST-16 TEACHING IN WANDSWORTH, BUT LIMITED OPPORTUNITIES FOR WORK-BASED TRAINING

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An OFSTED report into area-wide post-16 education in Wandsworth notes ...
An OFSTED report into area-wide post-16 education in Wandsworth notes

that last year 70 per cent of 16-year-olds remained in full-time

education, mirroring national figures, but only four per cent

participated in work-based training, compared with nine per cent

nationally. Other main findings include:

- most teaching in the schools and sixth form college was good and a

large proportion was outstanding;

- many students in the sixth form college and three large sixth forms

perform in A levels well above the expectations generated by their

GCSE results. This is not the case in the smaller sixth forms;

- the choice of subjects in small sixth forms is limited;

-there is no collaboration between sixth forms to extend this choice;

- completion rates are mostly satisfactory in school sixth forms, but

low in colleges;

- students' results vary from above to well below national norms,

both in terms of pass rates and average point scores;

- teaching of key skills is a weakness in all sectors;

- learners with low levels of literacy and numeracy have little

access to work-based training at foundation level;

- good provision is made for special needs students.

The report also notes that 16 -19 education and training in

Wandsworth lack strategic direction and cohesive planning.

It says that plans for a new college in neighbouring Lambeth and

closure of GCE A level provision by the two general FE colleges in

Wandsworth make cross-borough planning, in conjunction with the

london central learning and skills council (LSC), an urgent priority.

Joint planning and collaboration should ensure access within

institutions to an appropriately broad curriculum for all young

people, especially those in small sixth forms.

Urgent action is needed to ensure sufficient high quality provision

is made to meet actual and potential demand.

Attention should also be paid to significant gaps in work-based

training provision across the borough. In planning, account should be

taken of local labour market information and employers' needs, the

report says.

Mike Tomlinson, chief inspector of schools, said:

'It is encouraging to see good teaching being done in Wandsworth, and the

good value in the larger sixth forms and sixth form college. A new

strategy is needed, to ensure all young people will have access to an

appropriate range of educational and training courses.'

NOTES

1. The report on the 16-19 area-wide inspection of Wandsworth is

published on the OFSTED web site. Media Copies of the reports are

being sent to all the providers of post-16 education and training

in each area, as well as to a number of other organisations, such

as careers services.

2. From autumn 1999, OFSTED has led area-wide inspections of 16-19

education and training. Inspections have concentrated mainly,

although not exclusively, on areas where the challenge to raise

achievement and participation is particularly acute.

3. Inspectors make judgements on access, the standards achieved by

students,the curricula, the quality of teaching and learning, the

support and guidance for students, management, strategy and cost

effectiveness.

4. OFSTED is a non-ministerial government department established

under the Education (Schools) Act 1992 to take responsibility for the

inspection of all schools in England. Its inspection role also

includes the inspection of local education authorities, teacher

training institutions, youth work and all 16-19 education. Since

September 2001 OFSTED has had responsibility for the regulation of

early years childcare, including childminders.

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