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GOVERNMENT BOOST EMPOWERS NEIGHBOURHOODS TO DO IT FOR THEMSELVES

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Fifteen communities in England faced with housing problems and ...
Fifteen communities in England faced with housing problems and

deprivation are being given the opportunity to make more decisions at

local level to improve their quality of life and local public

services. They will each benefit from an equal share of over £36m

government pilot funding spread over seven years, under the

second round of the Neighbourhood Management Pathfinders programme.

The communities benefiting span all parts of England from Cowpen Quay

in the North-East to Ilfracombe in the South-West, and were announced

today by ODPM minister Yvette Cooper.

The second round pathfinders include a new focus on rural areas in

order to broaden the kinds of areas that could benefit from

neighbourhood decision making. Local boards including residents work

with neighbourhood managers to get things done.

Neighbourhood Management Pathfinders establish partnerships between

local residents and local organisations to take decisions about

tackling problems such as crime, anti-social behaviour, vandalism,

improving facilities for young children and teenagers, poor quality

and empty houses, fly-tipping and environmental improvements, and

lack of skills and training.

The 15 new Neighbourhood Management Pathfinders demonstrate the

government's support for expanding opportunities for local

neighbourhoods to make their own decisions. Ms Cooper said:

'This second round of Neighbourhood Management Pathfinders has been

targeted at neighbourhoods which are experiencing specific

challenges, such as rural areas in which it can be difficult to

access services, or areas where low housing demand has blighted the

housing market.

'People want to feel proud of where they live. But to often they

don't feel they can influence the key decisions that affect their

local quality of life. These Neighbourhood Management Pathfinders

have set up Neighbourhood boards including local residents and

councils and local mange rs to get things done and make an immediate

impact. It is important that people in low-income areas should get a

greater say in how to improve their area and more support to get

things done.'

NOTES

1. The 15 round two Neighbourhood Renewal Pathfinders are listed

below:

Neighbourhood Local authority Government

district Office

Cowpen Quay Blyth Valley North East

Ovenden Calderdale Yorkshire and

Humberside

Crosby North Lincolnshire Yorkshire and

Humberside

East Blackburn Blackburn with Darwen North West

Tranmere Wirral North West

Fordbridge Solihull West Midlands

Oldington and Foley Park Wyre Forest West Midlands

Manton Bassetlaw East Midlands

North Wisbeach Fenland East

Church Street Westminster London

South Bermondsey Southwark London

Leyton Waltham Forest London

Hawkinge Shepway South East

Pan Isle of Wight South East

Illfracombe, Combe Martin North Devon South West

and Bratton Fleming

2. Funding for both Neighbourhood Management Pathfinders (NMPs)

rounds 1 and 2 comes from the ODPM's New Ventures Fund.

3. ODPM will provide funding for round 2 NMPs of £36.75m

distributed as follows:

- up to £200,000 to commence recruitment of key staff, establish the

partnership and operating systems, and to develop the delivery plan

- after approval of the delivery plan, then up to an average of

£350,000 per year over seven years (subject to confirm ation of

resources in future spending reviews by the government).

The second round is focusing on the following circumstances:

- communities at risk of decline through low housing demand

- pockets of deprivation in areas of high housing demand

- deprived rural areas

- opportunities to link neighbourhood management with changes to

housing investment and management

- involvement of registered social landlords

4. The first Neighbourhood Management Pathfinders comprised 20

partnerships in England.

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