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GUIDE TO ESTIMATING PREVALANCE OF DRUG MISUSE

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Practical guidance for local agencies in deciding what method to use in estimating the prevalence of drug misuse in...
Practical guidance for local agencies in deciding what method to use in estimating the prevalence of drug misuse in their areas is provided in a report published today by the Scottish Office.

This report should be of value to the new local authorities and, in particular, the new Drug Action Teams in assessing the requirements for service provision in local areas of Scotland.

The report, Estimating the Prevalence of Drug Misuse in Scotland: a Critical Review and Practical Guide, considers the value, as well as the cost implications, of conducting prevalence estimation in relation to other indicators of drug misuse to both policy makers and service providers.

It also provides a framework for considering various forms of prevalence estimation, including arguments for and against a national drug survey.

The report was commissioned in 1995 by the central research unit of the Scottish Office following the reports by the Scottish affairs committee and the ministerial drugs task force. It has been produced by Martin Frischer, a research consultant from the Scottish Centre for Infection and Environmental Health at Ruchill Hospital in Glasgow.
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