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HALF A MILLION MOVE TO ESCAPE NEIGHBOUR NOISE (ENGLAND)

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Nearly Two Thirds of Scots Bothered Neighbour Noise...
Nearly Two Thirds of Scots Bothered Neighbour Noise

Neighbour Noise Disturbs Nearly Half of Welsh Residents

Around half a million people have moved home in the last year because of noise, according to a new Ipsos MORI survey1.

It also found that for one in ten, noise affects quality of life, with Londoners and those renting council properties suffering most. Moreover, one in ten are kept awake by noise.

The poll, commissioned by NSCA2 highlights neighbour noise issues affecting residents across the UK, at the start of Noise Action Week3.

Mary Stevens, co-ordinator of Noise Action Week said:

'This new research highlights serious impact noise has on the quality of our local environments. Many neighbour noise problems are the result of inconsiderate behaviour, and can be solved by common sense, practical solutions being promoted at local level during Noise Action Week.'

The survey also found that people are now less likely to complain directly to their neighbours about noise than previously4. They are more likely to call the police, rather than the local authority officers with responsibility for noise. Councils now have more powers than ever to deal with noisy neighbours, including disturbances caused by burglar alarms.

Minister for local environment quality, Ben Bradshaw, said:

'Noise can make people's lives a misery and damage health. We all have a responsibility to be considerate. Local authorities and the police need to

use the new powers the Government has given them5 to deal with the minority of people who inflict unwarranted noise on their neighbours.'

During Noise Action Week local authorities, housing providers and mediation services across the country will be providing advice and information on reducing noise, realistic expectation of noise and legislation to manage noise6.

Notes

1. The Ipsos MORI survey comprised in-home face-to-face interviews with 1,962 adults aged 15+ throughout Great Britain, with 162 interviews conducted in Scotland and 97 in Wales. The sample is nationally representative, and interviews were conducted in 195 sampling points between 16-21 March 2006. Results are weighted to the GB population profile in terms of gender, age, region & work status. Results of the poll are available here.

2. NSCA is the environmental protection charity supported by pollution control professionals. We are working towards better management and reduction of noise problems through policy development and education.

3. Noise Action Week is an annual national campaign supported by the UK government and the devolved administrations in N Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

4. 2002/3 Ipsos MORI poll commissioned by Defra found 28% complained to neighbours compared to 23% in 2006.

5. Local authorities were given new powers under the Clean Neighbourhoods

and Environment Act 2005 to deal with nuisance noise. These include powers to enter premises to silencean alarm that has been ringing for over 20 mins (without force), and to require people with burglar alarms to have

alternative keyholders and tell the Council who they are, reducing the

blight of false alarms. More details are available at:

http:www.defra.gov.uk/environment/localenv/legislation/cnea/index.htm

6. See http:www.noiseactionweek.org.uk

Nearly Two Thirds of Scots Bothered Neighbour Noise

A Ipsos MORI survey indicates that in Scotland nearly two thirds of people are bothered by noise from neighbours. The noises that disturb people most are those from everyday living - footsteps, doors slamming and shouting. The survey finds that footsteps bother 14% of those surveyed and slamming doors 15%. The poll, commissioned by NSCA highlights neighbour noise issues affecting people across the UK at the start of Noise Action Week. It also found that 7% of those surveyed in Scotland say that noise affects their quality of life, with 11% of Scots having been kept awake by neighbour noise.

'This new research highlights the impact that noise from everyday living can have on quality of our local environments' says Mary Stevens, co-ordinator of Noise Action Week 'Many neighbour noise problems are the result of inconsiderate behaviour, and can be solved by the common sense, practical solutions being promoted at local level during Noise Action Week.'

The survey also found that 17% of Scots believe themselves to be noisier than their neighbours, but that they are less likely to make a complaint about noise than people in England and Wales.

During Noise Action Week the Scottish Federation of Housing Associations are running briefings on Housing and Sound Insulation, aimed at property maintenance and development staff, in Glasgow and Edinburgh, and organisations across Scotland will be promoting practical solutions to noise problems.

Neighbour Noise Disturbs Nearly Half of Welsh Residents

Nearly half the people in Wales are disturbed by neighbour noise, according to a new Ipsos MORI survey. The survey also indicates that noise affects the quality of life of one in ten of those surveyed. The noises that disturb the Welsh most are those from everyday living - shouting and arguments, children and cars and motorbikes. The poll, commissioned by NSCA, highlights neighbour noise issues affecting people across the UK at the launch of Noise Action Week.

'This new research highlights the impact that noise from everyday living can have on quality of our local environments' says Mary Stevens, co-ordinator of Noise Action Week.

'Many neighbour noise problems are the result of inconsiderate behaviour, and can be solved by the common sense, practical solutions being promoted at local level during Noise Action Week.'

The survey also found that 5% of Welsh people surveyed had argued with neighbours about the noise they themselves are making. Across the UK the research found that people are now less likely to complain directly to their neighbours than previously about noise and more likely to call the police, rather than the local authority - whose noise officers have the power to deal with noise complaints. During Noise Action Week, local authorities across Wales will be promoting their noise management services and highlighting simple, practical solutions to everyday noise problems.

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