Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

KEY SKILLS TARGET MET A YEAR EARLY

  • Comment
Figures published today show that Government targets on tackling skills shortages among young people and adults are...
Figures published today show that Government targets on tackling skills shortages among young people and adults are being met early.

The figures show an extra 21,000 19-year-olds achieved Level 2 qualifications (equivalent to 5 good GSCEs) in 2005 than in the previous year. This represents a rise of 3%, a year earlier than the Government's PSA target.

They also show that more young people are reaching Level 3 (2 'A'

Levels or equivalent) -up to nearly 46%, or a 3.5% rise from 2004.

Qualifications earned by adults are also on the rise with 464,000 more qualified to Level 2 or higher than 12 months ago. The figures show the Government is on course to meet the target of 1 million adults with Level 2 qualification by 2006, with an increase of over 841,000 passing their exams since Autumn 2002.

Vocational qualifications are also rising with more than 500,000 National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) awarded in 2005, more than any other year.

Skills Minister Phil Hope welcomed today's findings, adding that more work was needed to raise UK skills to compete on a world stage. He said:

'These figures demonstrate that we are making the progress needed to raise skills levels in this country. The increased support being given to students by schools, colleges and personal advisers is helping young people make the education choices that are right for them.

'The growth in Level 2 qualifications shows that more young people recognise the importance of staying in education and achieving.

'But we are not complacent. We know there is more to do and our 14-19 reforms will ensure that we can develop an education system where all young people can be motivated to learn, to progress in education and enter the workplace.

'As well as improving secondary education we will continue to ensure that all adults have the skills they need for work. We still lag behind other countries in our skills levels, but these figures show a welcome rise in attainment. We need to build on this progress to secure the training which adults and employers need to succeed.'

NOTES

1. The Statistical First Releases (SFRs) published 23 February 2006

are:

Level 2 and 3 Attainment by Young People in England Measured Using Matched Administrative Data: Attainment by Age 19 in 2005

(Provisional)

http:www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000637/index.shtml

The Level of Highest Qualification Held by Young People and Adults:

England 2005

http:www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000636/index.shtml

Vocational Qualifications in the UK: 2004/05 http:www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000638/index.shtml

2. The SFRs report against two PSA targets; Adults - reduce by at least 40% the number of adults in the workforce who lack NVQ 2 or equivalent qualifications by 2010; working towards this, one million adults in the workforce to achieve level 2 between

2003 and 2006 (also adopted by the LSC).

Young People - increase the proportion of 19 year olds who achieve at least level 2 by three percentage pointsbetween 2004 and 2006, and a further two percentage points between 2006 and 2008, and increase the proportion of young people who achieve level 3.

3. The SFR Vocational Qualifications in the UK 2004/05 shows record levels of awards of vocational qualifications. Over 5.5 million NVQs (and SVQs) have now been awarded since their introduction. Last year saw the highest number of NVQs awarded - 574,000.

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions.

Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.