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LAND USE CHANGE IN ENGLAND

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New statistics of changes in land use are published today by the department of the environment, transport and the r...
New statistics of changes in land use are published today by the department of the environment, transport and the regions (Land Use Change in England No. 12, Statistical Bulletin). This statistical bulletin presents estimates of changes in land use for England, and in particular estimates of changes to urban uses (especially to residential use) for regions and counties.

KEY RESULTS (presented in the attached tables)

Land use change in 1992

In 1992, 25 per cent of all changes were from a rural use to an urban use; 34 per cent were from one urban use to another; and 38 per cent were from one rural use to another.

There was a net change of land from rural uses to urban uses of about 4,800 hectares. The largest net change to a use was to residential (about 4,100 hectares) and the largest net change from a use, of about 7,100 hectares, was from agricultural land.

Changes to residential use between 1985 and 1995

In 1985 38 per cent of land changing to residential use was previously developed for urban uses. This is all land which is or has been built on, and thus includes land left vacant following previous development. In the most recent years (1993 to 1995) the percentage has increased to between 45 and 50 per cent.

In 1993, at the the regional level, the percentage of land changing to residential use that was previously developed ranged from between 30 and 35 per cent in the South West and East Midlands, to over 80 per cent in London.

The results also indicate that the proportion of residential development taking place on previously developed vacant land has increased - for England from 11 to 24 per cent between 1988 and 1994.

This increase should be treated with some caution as it may partly be an effect of the recent increased frequency of surveying, which makes it more likely that the previous use is recorded as vacant rather

than the preceding developed use.

Changes to all urban uses in 1992

In 1992, half of all new development for urban uses was on land previously developed for urban uses. A further 8 per cent of new development was on land in built-up areas that had not previously

been developed and was not in rural uses. 33 per cent of land developed for urban uses was previously used for agriculture.

A Changes within and between urban and rural uses

Percentage of land changing use 1985 1992

within rural uses 50 38

within urban uses 24 34

from rural uses to urban uses 23 25

from urban uses to rural uses 4 3

all changes 100 100

B Previous uses of land changing to residential use

Percentage of land changing: 1985 1991 1992 1994* 1995*

to residential

agriculture 44 38 36 37 33

other rural uses 8 7 6 6 5

all rural uses 52 44 42 42 38

land previously developed 38 44 47 45 50

for urban uses.

previously undeveloped vacant

land in built-up areas 10 12 12 13 12

all urban uses 48 56 58 58 62

-- preliminary estimates

C Previous uses of land changing to all urban uses

Percentage of land changing to all

urban uses from: 1985 1992

agriculture 38 33

other rural uses 11 9

all rural uses 49 42

land previously developed for urban uses 45 50

previously undeveloped vacant land

in built-up areas 7 8

all urban uses 51 58

NOTES

1. The information is contained in Land Use Change in England No. 12, a Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions Statistical Bulletin (ISBN 1 85112 045 9).

Available from: Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Publications Sales Centre, Unit 8, Goldthorpe Industrial Estate, Goldthorpe, Rotherham S639BL. Price£8. Telephone 01709 891318. Facsimile 01709 881673.

2. The statistics are based on changes in land use recorded for the Department by Ordnance Survey during their map revision work between 1985 and 1996. They relate to both the new use and previous use of land, and changes between uses. Results are presented for ten land use groups, of which the vacant land group has been disaggregated to provide separate figures for previously developed and previously undeveloped vacant land. The land use groups can be aggregated broadly into 'rural' and 'urban' uses.

3. It should be noted that the previously undeveloped vacant land in built-up areas' category, referred to in the commentary and attached table, does not include playing fields, parks, or other land in rural uses within built-up areas. This is a specific category of vacant land, which is not in agricultural use, has not been previously developed, but which is surrounded by built-up land.

4. Owing to the time lag between change taking place and its being recorded, it is necessary for most uses, to cover five years of data

collection in order to provide reliable results. Hence the most recent year for which mosts results are presented is 1992, based on information collected between 1992 and 1996. Changes to residential

use are recorded more quickly, and the bulletin also presents preliminary results for such changes which occurred in 1994 and 1995.

In addition, information on the density at which dwellings have been built is included, as aggregated results for 1989 to 1994, at national and regional level. Technical enquiries should be addressed to Stephen Hall, Planning and Land Use Statistics Division (Telephone 0171 890 5536. Facsimile 0171 890 5519).

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