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MIDDLE CLASSES GAIN MOST FROM ANTI-POVERTY DRIVE

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A report published today by the Family Policies Studies Centre reveals government policies designed to tackle pover...
A report published today by the Family Policies Studies Centre reveals government policies designed to tackle poverty have been of more benefit to middle-income households that to the poorest households.

The Times (p6) reports that, according to the study, although the overwhelming majority of households are better off as a result of the changes made in the past three Labour Budgets, more than one quarter of the poorest households have lost out financially.

The two biggest losers in the anti-poverty drive are the richest tenth of the population, 39.2% of whom have become worse off, and the poorest tenth, 28.1% of whom have lost out.

Overall, 47% of families have gained about£1 a week from the budgetary changes. The biggest improvements are for families with children and those in the middle-income brackets, where as many as 73% of people are up to£10 a week better off.

The report was drawn up by the Townsend Centre for International Poverty Research, a non-aligned research body that compiled its figures from a wide range of government and independent data.
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