Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

MINISTER FOR WORK WELCOMES NEW DEAL'S CONTINUING SUCCESS

  • Comment
Minister for work Nick Brown today welcomed the continuing success of ...
Minister for work Nick Brown today welcomed the continuing success of

New Deal for Young People. Latest figures show that 312,760 young

people have now moved off benefit and into work through New Deal and

in June alone 9,700 moved into jobs.

Mr Brown said:

'These latest figures reflect the success New Deal is achieving

across the country and how it is bringing real changes to young

people's lives.

'Youth unemployment is at its lowest level since the mid seventies

and long-term youth unemployment has fallen by 74% since July 1997.

New Deal has helped to reduce it further and faster.

'We are looking to build on the success of the New Deal by improving

flexibility and having a greater focus on the needs of employers in

crucial sectors of the economy, helping fill their vacancies and end

their skills shortages.'

NEW DEAL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE AND LONG-TERM UNEMPLOYED PEOPLE AGED 25+:

STATISTICS TO JUNE 2001

Coverage: Great Britain

Theme: Labour Market

Introduction

The New Deal for young unemployed people was introduced nationally on

April 6 1998. The New Deal for long-term Unemployed People aged 25+

was introduced nationally on 29 June 1998. This Statistical First

Release is the latest in a regular monthly series giving key

information for the period ending May 2001 on the numbers

participating in both New Deals, on their personal characteristics

such as gender, ethnic origin and disability, and the route that they

follow through the New Deal process. From April 2001, the New Deal

25+ was extended and enhanced to provide clients with access to a

greater and more tailored range of support and provision. Eligibility

has been extended to include those who have been claiming Jobseeker's

Allowance for 18 months. Tables showing starts on the enhanced

programme and the eligibility breakdown of clients are published in

this Release.

Key points New Deal for Young People:

- 312,7 60 young people into jobs to the end of June 2001. Of which,

243,460 are sustained jobs, and 69,300 were jobs lasting less than 13

weeks;

- 669,300 starts on New Deal by the end of June 2001-:- 577,700 have

left, leaving 91,600 participants at the end of June 2001;

- of the leavers, 39% have entered sustained unsubsidised jobs, 11%

have transferred to other benefits, 20% have left for other known

reasons, and 30% for unknown reasons;

- 243,460 young people into sustained jobs to the end of June 2001.

Of which 214,790 unsubsidised and 28,680 subsidised;

- of all Options starts to June 2001, 98,900 (41%) were to Full-time

Education and Training, 46,600 to the Employment option (19%), 50,200

to the Voluntary sector option (21%), and 47,300 (19%) to the

Environment Task Force.

New Deal for Long-Term Unemployed People aged 25+: pre-April 2001

entrants - 73,580 people into jobs to the end of June 2001. Of

which, 60,800 are sustained jobs, and 12,780 were jobs lasting less

than 13 weeks;

- 356,800 starts on New Deal by the end of June 2001 - 322,800 have

left, leaving 34,100participating at the end of June 2001;

- 13% of entrants have been aged between 25-29. In contrast, 29%

have been older clients aged 50 and over;

- 60,800 people into sustained jobs to the end of June 2001. Of

which 47,670 unsubsidised and 13,130 subsidised;

- To the end of June 2001, 16,100 clients have taken up the Employer

subsidy, 8,000 have began Education and Training Opportunities (ETO),

and a further 25,000 have entered Work Based Learning for Adults/TFW.

Due to the Release of LMS 12 at the beginning of April 2001 starts to

WBLA and ETO may be under counted due to changes in the recording of

new starts.

- 48% of all leavers from the Advisory Process return to their

regular pattern of jobseeker activity i.e. they remain on JSA without

taking up a New Deal opportunity.

Enhanced New Deal for Long- Term Unemployed People aged 25+: entrants

from April 2001

- 12,200 starts on New Deal during June 2001 increasing the total

starts to the enhanced programme 33,400 since April 2001. Males make

up 82% of all starts. The age on entry pattern is similar to that of

pre-April 2001 entrants, with nearly 50% under the age of 40. The

proportion of entrants from ethnic minority groups (12%) mirrors that

of pre-April 2001 entrants, but there are a slightly higher

proportion of entrants to the enhanced New Deal 25plus programme with

a disability (24%).

Notes on the Tables

New Deal for Young People:

Table 1 summarises the numbers entering and leaving New Deal in the

period January 1998 to June 2001. The total number participating

built up from 6,500 at the end of January 1998 to over 14,000 at the

end of March 1998; since the national roll-out at the beginning of

April 1998, the total rose to a peak of 150,100 at the end of July

1999. The current figure at the end of June 2001 stands at 91,600 on

New Deal for Young People. Of those starting, 72% have been male and

12% of total entrants have been people with a disability. There have

been 96,200 starts from ethnic minority groups (14%) of which more

than one in five are Pakistani, around one in three Black

African/Caribbean, and around one in eight Indian. The proportion of

female starts among ethnic minority starts, at 34%, is substantially

greater than the 28% of all starts who are female.

Table 2 shows where those participating at the end of June 2001 were

in the New Deal process. 54% are on the Gateway. Of the 27,500 who

were on an option, 40% were in Full-Time Education and Training, 17%

were on the Employment option, 23% on the Voluntary Sector option,

and 20% on the Environment Task Force option. There are a declining

number of people in the Follow- Through phase of New Deal 15,500

(17%), although it is anticipated that some of these will later

re-join op tions.

Looking at the proportions of males and females participating in New

Deal at various stages highlights significant differences between the

options chosen. At the end of May 2001, 36% of women opted to work in

the voluntary sector compared with only 19% of men. Around a quarter

of men on an option were on the Environment Task Force , compared

with only one in 20 women. People with a disability are less likely

to be on Gateway, 46% compared to an overall proportion of 54%.

Notable differences between those from ethnic minority groups are

they are more likely to be on Gateway, 59% compared to 51% of Whites.

Looking at those ethnic minorities on an option highlights

significant differences. Only 11% are on the employment option

compared to 17% of whites and 52% of ethnic minorities on an option

were in Education and Training compared to 40% of Whites. Within the

ethnic groups, Indians are more likely to be on Gateway (63%) and

Black Africans on an option are less likely to be in employment, 5%.

Bangladeshi's are most likely to have opted to work in the voluntary

sector.

Table 3 gives the breakdown of the numbers entering by their

eligibility. Most entrants, 90%, are recruited as they come up for a

Restart interview, either as they cross the six-month unemployment

threshold or subsequently. There are a substantial number of

individuals unemployed for more than 6 months, 26% overall choosing

to join New Deal before reaching their next Restart interview. In May

2001, only 10% chose to enter New Deal before their restart date 7%

of those entering New Deal did so under one of the early entry

criteria.

Table 4a shows the immediate destinations of the 620,300 young people

who have left the New Deal Gateway. These are made up of 377,300 who

left New Deal altogether, and 243,000 who left to take up an option.

Of those who left New Deal altogether, 162,600 are known to have gone

into an unsubsidised job. A further 10 7,900 went into other known

destinations - of which nearly a half transferred to other benefits.

Of those whose destination is not known, a proportion will have gone

into jobs, but have not been recorded as such in the systems which

generate the data. However, a survey published in June 1999

established that many of the leavers to unknown destinations in fact

found an unsubsidised job. Overall, 57% of the respondents to the

survey who had left JSA stated that they had left to go into

employment. If the 57% is applied to the 106,800 leavers from the

Gateway to unknown destinations, the total number of leavers from the

Gateway into unsubsidised jobs would increase from 162,600 to

223,480.

In total, 209,200 young people have gone into jobs from the Gateway,

more than three quarters of them being unsubsidised jobs.

Tables 4b/4c show separate figures by region and detailed ethnic

group respectively. These show a number of differences, most notably

that there is significant regional variation in the proportion of

leavers to an unknown destination from the Gateway: 10% for Northern

region and 24% for London and the South East. The proportion of

starts on each option varies between regions, with the South West

having the highest proportion on the employment option (25%) and on

the Environment Task Force Wales has the highest proportion (25%).

The North has the most people opting for Education and Training at

50%. Looking at the voluntary sector, there are significantly more

people on that option in the Southern regions. Within ethnic minority

groups, of those who have left the Gateway, Indians are most likely

to have left for unsubsidised jobs (30%) and Black Africans least

likely (18%). Of the ethnic minority groups, Black Africans are more

likely to go into an option (41%), and Indians much less likely at

26%. There is significant variation within which option was chosen by

different ethnic groups, with the employment option attracting a

higher proportion of Indians (19%), in contrast to Black Africans of

whom only 7% on an option chose employment. Almost two thirds of

Black Africans chose Education and Training. Of the ethnic minority

groups, the voluntary sector has a significantly higher proportion of

Bangladeshis (37%). Finally there is little variation between ethnic

minority groups in the proportion of unknown destinations, however as

a whole those from an ethnic minority group have a much higher

proportion of unknown destinations than whites.

Table 5 shows the qualifications on entry of those joining New Deal.

Overall, 68% (of those for whom the information is available) said

that they had a qualification and of those, 39% were equivalent or

higher than an NVQ level 2.

Table 6 shows summary figures for the Employment Service regions and

for Wales and Scotland. There is distinct variation between the

regions in the current position of New Deal participants at the end

of June 2001. The region with most at the Gateway stage is LASER

(59%), 5 percentage points higher than the national proportion. The

North has the lowest proportion at the Gateway stage, 46%. Looking at

the option split, those in the South West are more likely to choose

employment, and those in LASER and Northern education. The

Environment Task Force option was only chosen by 12% of those on an

option in London & the South East, where as in the Scotland, this

figure was 28%. Working in the voluntary sector appears to be a less

attractive option in the Northern region. These regional variations,

will affect the way different areas have implemented New Deal.

Table 7 Shows the progress of the 15,305 young people who had their

first interview in October 1999. This shows than 1% still on the

Gateway at the end of June 2001, 2% still on an option, of which the

Education and Training option has the most clients, 3% on Follow

Through and 95% having left New Deal .

Table 8 in similar format shows the figures for those who had their

first New Deal interview in January 2000. Of the 1% of clients still

on the Gateway at the end of May 2001, 75% had had a cumulative

Gateway spell on JSA of greater than 4 months.

Table 9 shows how the 12,440 young people who joined New Deal in

April 2000 have progressed by June 2001. 5% were on a New Deal

option, 87% had left New Deal, 7% were on Follow- Through and 1% were

still on the Gateway. Of those left on an option, 56% were on

Education and Training.

Table 10 compares the progress of different groups within the April

2000 cohort. Comparing males and females shows that women are

slightly more likely to have left New Deal altogether at the end of

June 01. Within options, men are more likely to be on the ETF option.

Among those who have left, women are twice as likely than men to have

transferred to another benefit. The pattern for people with

disabilities differs in several respects from the overall picture.

The proportion having left is slightly lower for people with

disabilities, although, of those who have left, people with

disabilities are more likely to have transferred to another benefit.

Differences between ethnic minority groups and white participants are

that ethnic minority clients are slightly less likely to have left

for an unsubsidised job, and more likely to have left for an unknown

destination. Ethnic minority clients are slightly more likely to

still be on the Gateway. The final comparison is between those with

qualifications at NVQ level 2 or above, and those with other or no

qualifications. Among those that have left, people with NVQ2 or

higher qualifications are much more likely to have left for an

unsubsidised job. Those with qualifications below NVQ 2 level have a

higher probability of being on the Environment Task Force option or

to have transferred to other benefits.

Table 11 gives the destinations on leavin g New Deal for all those who

have left to date, broken down into those who left before receiving

their first interview, those who left during the Gateway phase having

had at least one interview, those who have left from an option, and

those who have left from Follow-Through. The information given

includes details of the most recent option that Follow Through

leavers were on. In total, 39% of all leavers to date have entered an

unsubsidised job. Of the 577,700 leavers to the end of June 2001,

most - 312,100 - left during the Gateway stage, after having at least

one interview. Some 65,200 left before having their first New Deal

interview, 80,600 so far have left directly from an option, and

119,800 have left from Follow-Through. Even among those who left

before attending their first interview, 34% are known to have gone

into unsubsidised employment.

If the survey of leavers to unknown destinations which was published

in January 2001, is applied to the total number of leavers into

unsubsidised jobs the total would increase from 224,300 to 320,170

(56%).

To date, 215,900 young people have left an option. Of these 7% remain

on New Deal (on the Follow-Through), 29% have entered unsubsidised

employment, 7% transferred to other benefits, 30% left for unknown

destinations (including some who will have found a job but have not

been recorded as such in the systems which collate the data), 27%

left for other known destinations including some clients who left New

Deal on completion of Follow-Through.

Table 12 shows the number of young people who have entered employment

on leaving the New Deal split by sustained periods of employment

(whereby the person does not return to JSA within 13 weeks) and

'other' employment of a more short-term nature. To the end of June

2001, 243,460 young people have gained sustained employment - 88% of

this unsubsidised. An additional 69,300 young people have had a job

spell of less than 13 weeks . This takes the total number of young

people into jobs at the end of June 2001 to 312,760. 73% of young

people entering sustained employment have been men, and 12% have been

from ethnic minority groups.

Table 13 shows the total number of jobs filled by young people

through the New Deal. This differs from Table 12 to the extent that a

young person may have had more than one spell of employment. For

example, a period on the Employment option followed by an

unsubsidised job is a common transition. To the end of June 2001,

265,200 sustained jobs have been gained through New Deal - more than

three quarters of this unsubsidised. An additional 179,370 job spells

of less than 13 weeks have also occurred.

New Deal for Long-Term Unemployed People aged 25+: pre-April 2001

entrants

Note: tables LTU1-7 show participation and outcomes for those joining

the programme before April 2001. As such there are no new starts

shown in these tables, and the figures on activity and outcomes

relate solely to those entering the programme prior to April 2001. A

separate set of tables is being introduced over the coming months

showing participation and outcomes from the enhanced 25plus New Deal

programme. Up to now tables LTUE1 and LTUE2 showing starts and

eligibility criteria are included.

Table LTU1 summarises the numbers entering and leaving New Deal over

the period July 1998 to June 2001. The total number participating

built up from 12,600 at the end of July 1998 to a peak of 82,100 at

the end of December 1999. At the end of June 2001, the total number

on New Deal 25+ was 34,100. Of all those joining, 84% have been male.

21% of total entrants to date have been people with a disability.

There have been 36,000 starts from ethnic minority groups. 90% of

clients who started between July 1998 and June 2001 have left the

programme. Clients aged 25-29 form 13% of all entrants. Conversely,

'older' clients aged 50+ form 29% of all entrants to the end of June

2001.

Table LTU2 shows where those participating at the end of June 2001

were in the New Deal process. As one would expect, with the Advisory

Interview Process designed to last for 3-6 months from the date of

the first New Deal interview, the majority, 76%, are still on it. The

remainder were on a New Deal opportunity: 1,700 on the Employer

Subsidy, and 800 on Education and Training Opportunities. An

additional 2,300 were on Work Based Learning for Adults and 3,200 are

at the Follow-Through stage. People with disabilities and those from

ethnic minority groups are just as likely to have moved onto a New

Deal specific measure, or be on Work Based Learning for Adults. Older

clients are progressively more likely to still be in the Advisory

stage of New Deal.

Table LTU3 gives the breakdown of the numbers entering by their

eligibility. Most entrants (90%) are recruited as they come up for an

annual Restart interview, either as they cross the 2 year

unemployment threshold or subsequently. There have been 15,000,

individuals (4%), unemployed for less than 2 years choosing to join

New Deal under one of the early entry criteria.

Table LTU4 shows the immediate destinations of the 330,800 people who

have left the Advisory Interview Process. Due to new functionality

introduced in LMS 12. Starts to the WBLA and ET opportunities may be

under represented. We aim to revise this in future months. 18% of

clients have left for employment (42,800 unsubsidised and 16,100

subsidised), 2% for Education and Training Opportunities, 8% for Work

Based Learning for Adults, 48% to normal jobseeker activity, and 24%

for other reasons. Men are slightly more likely to have left for

subsidised employment than women; but no more likely to have left for

unsubsidised employment. Conversely, women are more likely to have

left to transfer to another benefit. People with disabilities and

ethnic minority groups are both less likel y to have left the Advisory

process to return to their normal pattern of jobseeker activity.

Those with disabilities more likely to transfer to other benefits 16%

compared to 11%.

Table LTU5 shows summary figures for the Employment Service regions

and for Wales and Scotland. There is inevitably some variation

between the regions in the current position of New Deal participants

at the end of June 2001.

Table LTU6 shows the number of people who have entered employment on

leaving the New Deal split by sustained periods of employment

(whereby the person does not return to JSA within 13 weeks) and

'other' employment of a more short-term nature. To the end of June

2001, 60,800 people have gained sustained employment - more than

three quarters of this unsubsidised. An additional 12,780 people have

had a job spell of less than 13 weeks. 84% of people entering

sustained employment have been men and 9% have been from ethnic

minority groups. Within the total jobs count, men are less likely to

have had a sustained spell of employment than women and people from

ethnic minority groups are more likely to be in sustained

unsubsidised employment.

Table LTU7 shows the total number of jobs filled through the New

Deal. To the end of June 2001, 61,870 sustained jobs have been filled

through New Deal - three quarters of this unsubsidised.

New Deal for Long-Term Unemployed People aged 25+: entrants from

April 2001 Note: table LTUE1 shows entrants to the enhanced programme

from April 2001. A new Table LTUE2 shows starts to the enhanced

programme by eligibility. Over the coming months new tables will be

introduced showing participation and outcomes from the enhanced 25+

New Deal programme.

Table LTUE1 shows 12,200 starts to the enhanced New Deal during June

2001 making a total of 33,400 entrants since its introduction. 82% of

entrants have been Male. The age on entry pattern is similar to that

of pre-April 2001 entrants wit h clients aged 25-29 forming 14% of all

entrants. Conversely, 'older' clients aged 50+ form 25% of all

entrants to the end of June 2001.

The proportion of entrants from ethnic minority groups (12%) mirrors

that of pre-April 2001 entrants, but there are a slightly higher

proportion of entrants to the enhanced New Deal 25plus programme with

a disability (24%).

Table LTUE2 gives the breakdown of the numbers entering by their

eligibility. Most entrants (89%) are recruited as they come up for an

interview, either as they cross the 18 month unemployment threshold

or subsequently at a restart date. There have been 1,900, individuals

(6%), unemployed for less than 18 months who have been brought into

the enhanced programme under one of the early entry criteria. A

further 5% have been brought into the programme before reaching a

restart date. This will include clients identified by their New Deal

adviser as being unemployed for 18 out of a 21 month period in which

case New Deal is a requirement.

NOTES

1. Introduction: The statistics in this Statistical First Release

cover participants in the New Deal for Young People and the Long-Term

Unemployed aged 25+ in Great Britain. The New Deal for Young People

is aimed at those aged 18-24 who have been claiming Jobseekers

Allowance (JSA) for at least 6 months. A fuller description of the

New Deal process was included in an article in the June 1998 issue of

Labour Market Trends ('New Deal and its effect on labour market

statistics'). Until April 2001, the New Deal for the Long-Term

Unemployed aged 25+ was aimed at those who have been claiming

Jobseekers Allowance (JSA) for at least 2 years. From April 2001, an

enhanced programme for those who have been claiming Jobseeker's

Allowance for 18 months or more was introduced.

- New Deal for Young People:

2. Eligibility: Those aged 18-24 who have been claiming JSA

continuously for 6 months become eligible for New Deal w hen they

reach the 6-month threshold. At that point, their participation is

mandatory. Those who have already been unemployed for 6 months are

required to enter New Deal when they reach their next 6-monthly

Restart interview date, but are entitled to request immediate entry

before then. There are eleven additional groups who are entitled to

entry to New Deal before reaching the 6-month point (see below).

3. Outline of process: Those joining New Deal first enter a Gateway

period lasting up to 4 months, during which Employment Service (ES)

and their partners will work with them to improve their

employability, and to find unsubsidised jobs for as many as possible.

Those who do not find a job will then move onto one of four options:

-a period of subsidised employment, lasting 6 months (including,

from June 1998, support to become self-employed)

- a course of full-time education/training

- a job with an Environment Task Force

- a job in the Voluntary Sector

4. As far as possible, young people will be offered a choice of

options. They do not however have the option of remaining on JSA.

5. If the client reaches the end of their option, and still has not

obtained a job, they will normally re- claim JSA, and will enter a

Follow-Through period. During this, they will remain on JSA, but

receive intensive help to find a job.

- New Deal for Long-Term Unemployed People (pre-April 2001

entrants):

6. Eligibility: Those aged 25+ who have been claiming JSA

continuously for 2 years become eligible for New Deal when they reach

the 2 year threshold. At that point, their participation is

mandatory. Those who have already been unemployed for 2 years are

required to enter New Deal when they reach their next annual Restart

interview date, but are entitled to request immediate entry before

then. There are a number of additional groups who are entitled to

entry to New Deal before reaching the 2 year point (see below).

7. Outline of process: Those joining New Deal first enter an Advisory

Process lasting between 3-6 months with an average of 7 interviews

during which Employment Service (ES) and their partners will work

with them to improve their employability, and to find unsubsidised

jobs for as many as possible. From April 2000, the Advisory Process

has been enhanced. The key features are: use of the Client Progress

KIT at the initial interview to assess the clients' needs; a more

structured Advisory Process, re-named as Gateway which is timebound

and comprises on average ten weekly interviews plus case conferences

between the Adviser and their Manager at one, three and four months.

During the Gateway, clients can also be referred to a new range of

external specialist Gateway provision, or benefit from a Jobseeker's

Grant. Those who do not find a job or transfer to other provision may

move onto one of the two New Deal specific measures:

- a period of subsidised employment, lasting 6 months

- a course of full-time education/training lasting up to a year

whilst remaining on JSA

8. If the client reaches the end of their Advisory Interview Process

without taking up an opportunity, they may return to their normal

jobseeker activity and will re-enter at their next full year Restart

Interview.

9. A further series of interviews are available as part of the

Follow-Through for those returning from subsidised/unsubsidised

employment or existing training provision within 13 weeks of leaving

JSA/completing the provision, and those completing Education and

Training Opportunities.

- Enhanced New Deal for Long-Term Unemployed People (entrants from

April 2001):

10. Eligibility: Those aged 25+ who have been claiming JSA

continuously for 18 months become eligible for New Deal when they

reach the 18 month threshold. At that point, their participation is

mandatory. People who have claimed JSA for 18 out of the last 21

months can opt to join the programme, although participation of

people in this category will become mandatory once IT supports it.

Those who have already been unemployed for 18 months are required to

enter New Deal on a staggered basis over the next two years depending

on their previous participation on New Deal; but they are entitled to

request immediate entry before then. There are a number of additional

groups who may be considered for early entry to New Deal on the basis

of labour market disadvantage.

11. Outline of process: Those joining New Deal first enter a flexible

Gateway period lasting up to four months where provision and level of

help will be tailored to the needs of the individual. For those aged

25-49 who are still claiming JSA, the Gateway will be followed by a

mandatory Intensive Activity Period (IAP) lasting between 13 and 26

weeks. The IAP will often consist of flexible and individually

tailored 'routeways' or packages of support. The packages will

include at least two of the following: work experience, work

placements with employers, occupational training, help with

motivation and soft skills. All packages will be underpinned by

intensive jobsearch to help people move on from their IAP into work

as quickly as possible. It will also be possible for the IAP to

consist of self employment support or Basic Employability Training

programme which is designed to address the barriers faced by people

who find it particularly difficult to find jobs. Finally, for a small

number of New Deal participants the most appropriate provision will

be an Education and Training Opportunity of up to 12 months duration.

It will be possible for participants to move into subsidised

employment at any stage of the programme.

12. Those aged 50 and over who are still claiming JSA at the end of

their Gateway period will be move onto the IAP on a voluntary basis.

13. Those who return to JSA at the end of the IAP will move into

Follow-Through. There, they will undertake a period - usually 6

weeks, although exceptionally 13 weeks - of intensive jobsearch

designed to build on the experience gained in the IAP.

14. Source of the data: The original source of most of the data in

this Statistical First Release is the Labour Market System (LMS)

installed in Employment Service's local offices. This is an IT system

which is used to facilitate the interface with ES clients. It

maintains a basic client record; allows the preferred occupations

stated by clients to be matched against suitable vacancies; records

actions such as interviews, referrals to training opportunities,

placings in jobs etc. In particular, it has been significantly

enhanced to record New Deal-specific actions, such as starts on

options.

15. The relevant data are extracted from the main system each month

and added to a New Deal Evaluation Database maintained by ES's

Research and Development Division. This Evaluation Database also

incorporates data from other sources: data on claimant unemployment

extracted from the Joint Unemployment and Vacancies Operating System

(JUVOS) maintained by the Office for National Statistics, which is

the primary source of published statistics on claimant unemployment,

and further information on subsidised jobs taken from the appropriate

ES payments system. A fuller description of the sources for the

statistics in this Statistical First Release can be found in an

article in the June 1999 issue of Labour Market Trends.

16. Definitions: the following notes explain the definitions

underlying the data presented here, except where these are

self-explanatory - e.g. gender.

17. Date of entry: an individual is generally deemed as participating

in the New Deal from the date they are invited to interview. In the

case of those seeking early entry, this date may effectively be the

same as the date of that interview. In practice, the date on which

LMS records the individual as joining New Deal can in some cases be

the date of the interview rather than the date of the invitation, but

the difference is generally small.

18. Leaving New Deal: an individual leaves New Deal if:

- they terminate their JSA claim while on the Gateway/Advisory

Interview Process, either because they have obtained an unsubsidised

job, or for other reasons;

- they complete their option, and do not begin a new JSA claim,

either because they have obtained a job, or for other reasons;

- they leave their option early, and do not seek to re-claim JSA -

again, either because they have found a job or for other reasons;

- in a number of cases, they are marked New Deal excluded or not

required and continue to claim JSA;

- for long-term unemployed, they complete the mandatory interview

process and return to a normal jobseeker activity

19. Destinations on leaving Gateway/Advisory Interview Process:

individuals are shown as having left to go into employment if either:

they are recorded on LMS as having been placed in a job, and leaving

New Deal; or they are shown as having signed off for some other

reason, and the reason for termination of their JSA claim recorded on

JUVOS is to go into a job. These figures will understate to an extent

the proportion going into unsubsidised jobs, for two reasons.

Firstly, for a proportion (mainly of the more recent leavers), there

is no matching JUVOS off-flow record. Over time, more such matches

will be identified, and the figures revised as necessary. Secondly, a

significant proportion of those whose JSA claim is terminated simply

fail to sign on, without returning their JSA form, so that no reason

for termination is collected.

20. The study (New Deal for Young People: leavers with unknown

destinations: Jon Hales and Debbie Collins; ES Research Report; 21

August 1999) reports on a survey of a sample of those leaving New

Deal for u nrecorded destinations between April and August 1998. Of

all those who responded to the survey and whose JSA claim which

qualified them for New Deal had been closed, 57% stated that they had

left New Deal to go into paid employment. Caution is needed in

applying these results since some of those surveyed had, by the time

they were interviewed, rejoined New Deal, and would no longer be

included in the published figures for leavers. The figures given in

the text of this release should therefore be viewed as illustrative.

21. In addition, because those surveyed had all left by the end of

August 1998, they included very few who had been through a New Deal

option. The results can, therefore, be applied only to leavers during

Gateway, or before their first interview.

22. Where a person leaves and subsequently enters a new claim for JSA

within 13 weeks, they will rejoin at the point they left with the

interruption not counting towards their period of support. In the

tables in this Statistical First Release, such people are treated as

having been continuously on the Gateway/Advisory Interview Process.

23. 'Other benefits' refers to those who have moved from JSA to a

more appropriate benefit, for example Incapacity Benefit or Income

Support.

24. 'Other' consists of those who are not recorded on LMS as either

going into an unsubsidised job, or transferring to another benefit,

and who are recorded on JUVOS as either: gone abroad, started

education or training; 'other reason'. Also includes those who have

left New Deal but remain on JSA.

25. The 'not known' category includes both those for whom no JUVOS

off-flow information has been matched, plus those with a leaving code

of: 'not known'; ceased claiming; failed to sign. It should be noted

that these cases are 'not known' as far as the statistical reporting

systems are concerned - in some cases, staff in Jobcentres know the

reason for the individual ceasing to claim, but this is not captured

systematically by LMS. For young people, a separate survey has been

conducted of these cases, asking New Deal Personal Advisers what they

know about their destinations.

26. Starts on options are taken primarily from LMS. In the case of

the subsidised employment option, this is confirmed when there is a

record of a subsidy actually being paid to the employer.

27. Destinations on leaving after starting an option: These figures

are based on a combination of information: the returns which option

providers make when a client leaves the option, stating their

immediate destination; ES placings and other destinations recorded on

LMS; JSA termination codes.

28. People with a disability: this entry is based on the individual's

own assessment and signed confirmation given to ES staff, that the

person believes themselves to be disabled in accordance with the

Disability Discrimination Act definition. That is, they have a

physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term

effect on their ability to carry out normal day to day activities.

(Note that this will not necessarily be consistent with sources such

as the Labour Force Survey, which rely entirely on self-assessment,

without further discussion or endorsement.)

29. It is not the same as the early eligibility criterion: people

seeking early entry on the grounds of having a disability must be

assessed as having such; but some who have a disability will qualify

for New Deal entry for other reasons (primarily through length of

unemployment claim).

30. Ethnic origin: ES began recording ethnic origin from January

1998, but it was not recorded on IT systems until April. The backlog

of information for January to March 1998 starts has now been recorded

on the IT systems, although the data are less complete for those who

joined in January to March and left relatively quickly. For young

people, the effect of this is to understate the number of leavers

from ethnic minority groups, particularly in January 1998 to March

1998.

31. The basis of the data is self-assessment by the individual

client. The categories are the same as in most statistical sources,

except that there is a specific option for the client to record

'preferred not to say'. This option is chosen by around 3% of

clients.

32. Qualifications on entry: this information is collected from

clients during an interview at the Jobcentre. ES staff then code the

qualifications to an equivalent NVQ level. 'Other qualifications'

consists of all those which ES staff are unable to equate to an NVQ

level.

33. Although the NVQ equivalencies are standard, one should be

cautious in comparing these data with other sources such as the

Labour Force Survey, because of differences in the methods of data

collection.

34. Qualifications data are currently available for only a proportion

of starts.

35. Region: This Statistical First Release includes a summary

breakdown for Scotland, Wales and the regions of England. The regions

are the ES regions, rather than Government Office regions. The ES

regions are: Scotland , Wales, London and the South East; East

Midlands and Eastern; West Midlands; South West; Yorkshire and the

Humber; Northern; North West.

36. A separate Press Notice is released by the Office for the

National Assembly for Scotland, giving more detailed figures.

37. Cohort tables: These are defined as all those having their first

interview in a given month (Tables 7,8,9). The tables track where

these individuals were at the end of each month, with two provisos.

The first is that, where a participant leaves Gateway, for example to

take up a job, and then later re-joins New Deal, they are treated as

having been continually on New Deal. The second is that the

destination on leaving is their immediate destination; their status

may have changed since leaving New Deal.

38. Unit of Delivery: New Deal is being delivered by local

partnerships. The areas covered by these are known as Units of

Delivery. These areas are defined mostly in terms of ES Districts and

Jobcentre areas. The 12 Pathfinder areas were: Black Country,

Cornwall, Cumbria, Eastbourne, Lambeth, Newcastle, Sheffield &

Rotherham, South Derbyshire, Stevenage, Tayside, West Wales &

Swansea, Wirral.

Further Information

39. More detailed information on the New Deal can be found on the

Internet.

Enquiries

40. Public enquiries about the information in this Statistical First

Release should be addressed to : Russ Bentley, Employment Service,

Research and Development Division, 123, West Street, Sheffield. S1

4ER. 0114-259 6425.

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions.

Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.