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NEW PAY DEAL COULD TRANSFORM SCOTTISH TEACHING PROFESSION

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Representatives of Scotland's 32 local authorities that employ teachers will put a 'money for modernisation' deal o...
Representatives of Scotland's 32 local authorities that employ teachers will put a 'money for modernisation' deal on the table when pay talks with teachers' unions begin tomorrow.

The Scotsman (p1) reports that the offer, part of a deal which could result in shorter summer holidays or longer working days for some teachers, will feature a series of pay rises above the rate of inflation over the next three years.

The Scottish Joint Negotiating Committee, which is dominated by the Educational Institute of Scotland and the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities will meet tomorrow as part of a deal reached this year by the Millennium Review.

The two sides will now consider an overhaul of the career structure of teachers, including the seven layers of management in secondary schools, which Cosla has long argued is expensive and precludes a clear line of responsibility for actions and standards.

The agreement would be partly self-financed, using money saved from the retirement of older staff on relatively high salaries. But councils are also exptected to divert savings made from restructuring. Some local authorities are beginning to make substantial savings by merging departments such as education, sport and leisure, or transferring the organisation of adult education to further education colleges.

Ross Martin, the convener of education at West Lothian Council, one of the Cosla negotiators, said: 'The unions and Cosla recognise the need to re-establish teaching as a top profession properly rewarded to keep hold of talented staff and attract more in. There is a genuine willingness on both sides to move the profession forward.'

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