Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

PREVENTING SLIP AND TRIP INCIDENTS IN EDUCATION

  • Comment
New guidance on preventing slip and trip incidents in schools, ...
New guidance on preventing slip and trip incidents in schools,

colleges and universities has been published by the

Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

Last year there were more than 4,000 injuries to members of the

public and employees caused by slipping and tripping incidents at

education institutions around Britain.

The free information sheet Preventing slip and trip incidents in the

education sector advises on controlling slip and trip risks, such as:

- Preventing slip and trip risks at the design stage by ensuring

appropriate flooring with a slip resistant surface

- Cleaning up spillages immediately and ensuring floors are dried

after cleaning

- Establish a sensible shoe policy for all staff and students

- Providing adequate lighting - poor lighting or glare can obscure

slip and trip hazards

- Information and training - control measures that involve changes

to working practices can be as equally effective as physical control

measures

John Cullen, head of HSE's services sector said: 'Slips and trips can

happen to anyone. The majority of injuries caused by slips and trips

on the education sector are strains and sprains. More serious

injuries such as broken bones and head injury can also occur and can

lead to complications. Some slip and trip accidents can even result

in fatalities as a result of complications.'

But as well as being a major cause of injury, slips and trips can

also be a financial burden on the education sector.

Mr Cullen added: 'They have not always been taken seriously because

of a sense of inevitability about slip and trip incidents, and as a

result there has been poor management control. Yet they can be

prevented or controlled, often simply and at low-cost. So dealing

with them should be a priority.'

The guide has drawn on expertise from across the education sector and

focuses on the factors that contribute to slip and trip risks and the

practical precau tions that will reduce injuries. It also provides

information on eliminating slip and trip risks during the design

stages of construction or refurbishment.

Notes

1. Slip and trip incidents in education as reported to HSE 2000/01

2001/02 (provisional)

READ IN SIX COLUMNS

Members of the Public Employees

2000/01

Reported injuries*

Injuries due to slips & trips

% due to slips and trips

Reported injuries*

Injuries due to slips & trips

% due to slips and trips

Primary & secondary education 5 687 1 869 33% 4 124 1 445 35%

Higher and further education 740 163 22% 1 315 423 32%

2001/02 (provisional)

Primary & secondary education 2 795 805 29% 3 700 1 399 38%

Higher and further education 659 174 26% 1 793 643 36%

Reported injuries include fatal and major injuries to members of the

public and employees and over 3 day injuries to employees.

2. Attached at Annex one is a list of case studies of slip and trip

incidents in the education sector, reported to HSE. 3. Preventing

slip and trip incidents in the education sector was published as part

of HSE's Revitalising Health and Safety strategy and priority

programme on slips and trips.

4. This information sheet was produced through consultation with

HSE's Education Advisory Committees - the Higher and Further

Education Advisory Committee (HIFEAC) and the Secondary Education

Advisory Committee (SEAC), which consist of representatives from

educational establishments, educational associations, the Department

for Education and Skills (DfES) and trade unions. The Advisory

Committees' work plan supports the Revitalising Health and Safety

strategy and is contributing to HSE's priority programme on slips and

trips.

5. Copies of Preventing slip and trip incidents in the education

sector, Education information sheet No. 2 are available free f rom HSE

Books, PO Box 1999, Sudbury, Suffolk, CO10 2WA, tel: 01787-881165 or

fax: 01787-313995 and can be ordered online at

http://www.hsebooks.co.uk

Case studies of slip and trip incidents in the education sector,

reported to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

1. In November 2002 a canteen worker in a secondary education school

in Medway, Kent slipped over while working in a canteen and broke her

arm. The school investigated and took the following remedial action:

- non slip footwear supplied to all staff; deep clean carried out and

new cleaning products in use; long term floor replacement planned.

2. On 22 October 2002 a member of public slipped on a 30cm wide strip

of wet terrazzo flooring between the doormat and a moveable no slip

mat when leaving a building at a Higher Education institution in

Bath. She hit the back of her head on the glass door and also knocked

her knee and shoulder. Treatment at hospital was required and doctors

diagnosed soft tissue damage to her neck. The weather was showery at

the time. Remedial action taken included adjustment of the moveable

matting and a slippery floor sign was put up.

3. In August 2002 a cleaner slipped after cleaning a toilet floor in

a primary school in West Sussex. The floor had been specially chosen

for its slip resistant qualities and staff had been given training on

proper procedures for mopping. On this occasion those procedures had

not been followed.

4. In June 2002 a security guard fell through rotten wooden decking

on a balcony at a higher education institution in Liverpool. The

institution took the following remedial action by removing the

decking and planning to install a non-slip surface on the balcony as

well as the wooden steps leading to balcony.

5. In September 2002 an employee walking from his office to the

refectory in a higher education institution in Swindon, slipped on

liquid that had been left on the wooden laminate flooring by students

- thought to be remains of soft drink. Flooring was in good condition

and is not normally slippery. His knee became swollen and required

hospital treatment.

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions.

Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.