Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

ROAD TRAFFIC GROWS BY 2.7 PER CENT IN 1996

  • Comment
Motor traffic grew by 2.7 per cent in 1996, according to ...
Motor traffic grew by 2.7 per cent in 1996, according to

figures

released by thedepartment of transport today.

Provisional figures for the first quarter of 1997 show a

1.8 per cent

growth in motor traffic on the same quarter of 1996.

After growth of around four per cent per year in the

1980s, traffic

remained at about the same level between 1990 and 1993

before

moderate growth was resumed in the last three years.

However, traffic on motorways grew by 3.9 per cent last

year.

Motorways now carry more traffic than other trunk roads

although

motorways have only a quarter of the road length of trunk

roads.

Goods vehicle traffic grew in 1996 compared to 1995. This

is due to

an increase in heavy articulated lorry traffic. The

provisional

figures for the first quarter of 1997 indicate that this

growth is

continuing.

Table 1: Motor Traffic in Great Britain 1990-1995

Billion vehicle kilometres

Cars Light Goods All motor

& taxis vans vehicles vehicles

1985 250.5 25.2 23.0 309.7

1990 335.9 35.7 29.1 410.8

1991 335.2 37.2 29.0 411.6

1992 338.0 36.7 28.3 412.1

1993 338.5 36.5 28.5 412.2

1994 345.7 38.3 29.6 422.6

1995 353.2 39.1 29.8 430.9

1996 362.4 40.1 30.7 442.5

Light van traffic was 3.3 per cent higher in 1996 than in

1995. The

provisional figures for the first quarter of 1997 show a

1.7 per cent

growth on the equivalent period last year.

Pedal cycle traffic fell in 1996 compared to 1995 while

motorcycle

traffic grew by 1.6 two per cent.

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions.

Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.