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ROUNDUP OF LOCAL AUTHORITY STORIES IN THE NATIONAL PRESS - UPDATED 11:00HRS

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ENQUIRY FINDS BRADFORD 'THE ULTIMATE CHALLENGE IN RACE RELATIONS IN BRITAIN' ...
ENQUIRY FINDS BRADFORD 'THE ULTIMATE CHALLENGE IN RACE RELATIONS IN BRITAIN'
Race relations in Bradford are deteriorating, with communities becoming increasingly isolated along racial lines and segregated schools fuelling divisions, according to an official report seen by The Guardian(p1). The inquiry, chaired by Sir Herman Ouseley, was commissioned by Bradford City MDC and other groups before the riots to discover the extent of the racial problems plaguing the city.
TREASURY MINISTER ACCUSED OF 'INVENTING' PFI SUCCESS REPORT
A treasury minister was accused last night of misleading parliament by 'inventing' a report claiming the success of the government's flagship Private Finance Initiative. Andrew Smith, chief secretary to the treasury, is facing criticism after referring to a non-existent report by the national audit office to demonstrate that the PFI gave the taxpayer good value, reports The Independent(p2).
RENEWABLE ENERGY HAMPERED BY LOCAL PLANNING PROBLEMS
Local opposition and planning delays are the biggest obstacles to overcome if Britain is to meet green energy targets, the government will be told today by Chris Morris, general manager of Powergen renewables. Ministers want 10 per cent of electricity to be generated from renewable sources by 2010, compared with less than 3 per cent today. Wind power is expected to contribute about half of the new capacity, but British wind farm developments are in danger of lagging further behind continental European rivals unless local planning problems are overcome, reports the Financial Times(p4).
PM TO USE KEYNOTE SPEECH TO CLARIFY PUBLIC SERVICES REFORM POSITION
Tony Blair will take on his critics in the professions and trade unions this week by insisting that his government will press ahead with its flagship reforms of the public services. The prime minister will use a keynote speech to say that he will not be deflected from using the private sector to raise standards in the classroom and try to counter claims from union chiefs of woolly government thinking on the issue and insist that he has a 'clear vision' of the shape of the reforms, reports The Times(p2).
OPPOSING VIEWS ON ELECTED MAYORS
The Letters page of The Guardian(p17) carries the opposing views of two councillors. Cllr Richard Jameson from Dacorum, Herts, writes: 'An elected mayor would be what Lord Hailsham called an elective dictatorship,' while Cllr Nigel Todd from Newcastle City Council
believes that: 'The way to catch the popular imagination is by making it clear that a new elective office will mean a democratic fresh start.'
by Assistant Editor Neil Watson
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