Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

ROUNDUP OF LOCAL AUTHORITY STORIES IN THE NATIONAL PRESS - UPDATED 11:20HRS

  • Comment
IS GOVERNMENT CONCEALING RESULTS OF BIG PROJECTS WITH ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT? ...
IS GOVERNMENT CONCEALING RESULTS OF BIG PROJECTS WITH ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT?
The mammoth expansion of Heathrow airport; an explosive doubling of military training in a tranquil national park; a major road-scheme through cherished and protected countryside; and lots more houses on greenfield sites in the South-west. Voters learning of and affected by these projects might not be in the mood -to vote Labour on 7 June, so the government has quietly put them off. In each case, it has been in a position to make a decision for some time, probably already has in principle, and the likelihood is that all the projects will be given the go-ahead, to howls of protest from those affected, reports The Independent(p6).
NEW INDEX INDICATES REGIONAL IMBALANCES WILL WIDEN
A concentration of dynamic, growing businesses in London and the south-east will enable the region to enjoy well above average economic performance over the next year, but Wales, the West Midlands and the north-east will perform more than 10 per cent below the average. This is the conclusion of a new index of regional prospects reported in the Financial Times(p4), suggesting most regions can expect economic performance within 10 per cent of the national average. At the extremes, London scores 33 per cent higher than average, while Wales ranks bottom with 23 per cent lower than average.
EMPLOYERS DEALT TRUMP CARD AS 'E-BREAKS' REPLACE TEA BREAKS
Employees could soon be given a daily quota of personal web surfing, but just as the length of tea breaks sparked industrial strife, the frequency and duration of their internet equivalents are already threatening to cause friction. Systems giving staff a limited period of time to surf the net are being launched by software providers Websense in the US and Surfcontrol in the UK to crack down on time-wasting internet use at work. They say the feature, which enable termaination of employees' web connections after a time by managers, improves existing packages that permit employers to ban access to certain websites or at fixed times, reports the Financial Times(p4).
PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTORS MAY NOT MIX AS LABOUR WOULD HOPE
A comment piece in Financial Timesbelieves that Labour's manifesto has opened the door to an idea which is really big but now new: that all public services, from healthcare to schools to what used to be called council housing, could be funded out of taxation but provided entirely by the private sector. Some within the Conservative party have long yearned for such a model - witness the Tories' lengthy and finally unsuccessful flirtation with education vouchers for schools - and in many areas of government, public funded of private provision is already happening
by Assistant Editor Neil Watson
  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions.

Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.