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ROUNDUP OF LOCAL AUTHORITY STORIES IN THE NATIONAL PRESS

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SCHOOLS #1: PRIVATE OPERATORS TO MANAGE WORST SCHOOLS ...
SCHOOLS #1: PRIVATE OPERATORS TO MANAGE WORST SCHOOLS

Private sector operators will help manage about 30 of the country's 300 worst schools, under plans to be published by the government on Wednesday. The government's education white paper will contain measures to help the private sector deal with cases where reforms are being held back by poor governorning, but will not be given an in-built majority on governing bodies, reports the Financial Times(p1).

SCHOOLS #2: NEW FREEDOMS FOR HEADS AS PRIVATE TAKEOVERS OF FAILING SCHOOLS BECKON

Head teachers in successful secondary schools are to be given new freedoms to change the curriculum, vary staff pay and conditions, and even take over poor-performing schools. The moves form part of the government's plan for schools, Schools Achieving Success, to be published on Wednesday, which heads say the move could increase anxiety about a 'two-tier' state education system, reports The Guardian(p6). The education secretary, Estelle Morris, said on BBC1's Breakfast with Frost: 'I want to use our best schools to support schools that need to be better ... I've got a vision where good schools are freed up to innovate. Let them be the innovators of the next stage of school improvement. But more important than that, wouldn't it be better if they can go into the struggling schools and work with them closely to turn them around?'

PUBLIC HOSTILITY TO PRIVATE INVOLVEMENT IN PUBLIC SERVICES

The Times(p1) considers all the issues surrounding the public's unfavourable response to his plans to expand the role of the private sector in the public services. A MORI poll commissioned by the paper indicates that nearly half the electorate believe that health and education should be provided entirely by the public sector, and two thirds believe that they should be provided completely or mostly by the State.

by Assistant Editor Neil WatsonSCHOOLS #1: PRIVATE OPERATORS TO MANAGE WORST SCHOOLS

Private sector operators will help manage about 30 of the country's 300 worst schools, under plans to be published by the government on Wednesday. The government's education white paper will contain measures to help the private sector deal with cases where reforms are being held back by poor governorning, but will not be given an in-built majority on governing bodies, reports the Financial Times(p1).

SCHOOLS #2: NEW FREEDOMS FOR HEADS AS PRIVATE TAKEOVERS OF FAILING SCHOOLS BECKON

Head teachers in successful secondary schools are to be given new freedoms to change the curriculum, vary staff pay and conditions, and even take over poor-performing schools. The moves form part of the government's plan for schools, Schools Achieving Success, to be published on Wednesday, which heads say the move could increase anxiety about a 'two-tier' state education system, reports The Guardian(p6). The education secretary, Estelle Morris, said on BBC1's Breakfast with Frost: 'I want to use our best schools to support schools that need to be better ... I've got a vision where good schools are freed up to innovate. Let them be the innovators of the next stage of school improvement. But more important than that, wouldn't it be better if they can go into the struggling schools and work with them closely to turn them around?'

by visiting the association's websiteor

by writing to the National Association of Farmers' Markets, South

Vaults, Green Park Station, Bath BA1 1JB. Farmers' Market Month is

being launched this Sunday (2nd September) at Islington farmers'

market.

Ewen Cameron said: 'The report we published this week has shown that

all parts of the rural economy are interdependent and have been

devastated by foot and mouth. People want to know how they can help.

By choosing farm products, especially from the areas worst affected,

they can 'eat the view' and help sustain rural communities.

'Visiting and shopping at your local farmers' market is a great,

enjoyable way to do this. You can buy goods that are produced locally

and talk to stall-holders about how they were made and where they

come from, as well as making sure your money goes back into the local

rural economy. You will be surprised by the range and diversity of

food and drink on offer. Indeed some of the produce available at

farmers' markets might not be found anywhere else in the world and in

effect you'll be able to sample the unique tastes of your local

landscape.'

The Countryside Agency is supporting the initiative through its Eat

the View programme, which aims to make it easier for consumers to

buy, and farmers to sell, sustainably produced local goods and to

help consumers make the links between the produce they buy and the

countryside they love.

Notes

The Countryside Agencyis responsible for advising government and

taking action on issues affecting the social, economic and

environmental well-being of the English countryside.

The National Association of Farmers' Markets was set up in 1999 and

is a not-for-profit organisation. It aims to promote farmers' markets

and help its members to retain their standards and integrity in order

to preserve the social, environmental and economic benefits that

farmers' markets bring.

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