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ROUNDUP OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT NEWS IN THE SUNDAY NEWSPAPERS

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COUNCILS EMBARK ON RECYCLING JOBS BONANZA...
COUNCILS EMBARK ON RECYCLING JOBS BONANZA

The Mail on Sunday lambasts local government for embarking on a 'rubbish-recycling jobs bonanza' (p15). 'Green gauleiters create an empire of pointless posts', it claims.

It highlights the case of East Riding Council proposing to pay a composting officer a salary of£24,708,£7,000 more than a newly qualified teacher.

Also singled out are the post of recycling adviser at the Waste and Resources Action Programme -£40,000 plus bonus and benefits - and recycling and waste minimisation officer for Cambridge City Council -£32,487.

The newspaper also points out that WRAP is not the only official body set up to encourage recyling.

Its remit was very similar to the Local Authority Recycling Advisory Committee.

COLUMNIST LAYS INTO PROPOSED NEW 'RUBBISH TAX'

The Independent on Sunday carries an opinion piece by Alasdair Palmer attacking local government's request for new powers to levy a variable charge for household waste (p20).

He argues that whenever local government officials get more power, they invariably manage to abuse it. They force us to do things we don't want to do, and then waste or embezzle any extra money raised.

'It is not difficult to imagine the stupendous opportunities for council incompetence and corruption in the collection of the additional 'rubbish tax', never mind the formidable practical difficulties of making the system work.'

SCHOOLS TAKE MIGRANT PUPILS AFTER CLOSING THEIR DOORS TO NEW PUPILS

Schools that are full and have had to turn pupils away at the admissions stage are having to take dozens of extra pupils from the EU accession states of Poland, Latvia, and Lithuania, according to the Sunday Telegraph (p8).

It cites the example of Haven High Technology College in Boston, Lincolnshire. The school has a pupil admission number of 135, but, in consultation with the local education authority, suspended this number when eastern European families began coming to the school requesting places after the term had begun.

This problem is being encountered by secondary schools across the east of England, the article sates. It has prompted concerns that families from overseas are gaining places despite the fact that other families who had applied to the schools earlier had been rejected.

SURVEY REVEALS A NEW BREED OF PUBLIC SECTOR 'FAT CAT'

The massive salaries of top civil servants and the chief executives of state companies are creating a new breed of public sector 'fat cat', according to new research from Incomes Data Services.

The Sunday Times (p10) reveals that pay for the most senior directors working in the state sector rose by 7.4% last year, twice the national rate of increase.

The highest paid employee is John Armitt, chief executive of Network Rail, with a salary and bonus of£878,000, rising to over£1m including pension contributions.

The highest paid civil servant is Richard Granger, the man in charge of IT in the NHS, who earns£280,000 a year.

Steve Tatton, editor of the study, said senior people were being recruited from the private sector and did not want to take pay cuts. The disparity between their pay and that of existing officials was causing difficult tensions.

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