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ROUNDUP OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT STORIES IN THE NATIONAL PAPERS

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COMPULSORY PURCHASE CAN BEGIN AT OLYMPIC SITE...
COMPULSORY PURCHASE CAN BEGIN AT OLYMPIC SITE

The London Development Agency (LDA) has gained powers to evict businesses and residents that refuse to move from the Olympic site.

So far, 80 businesses, 200 residents and more than 150 travellers have not agreed to move from the Olympic Park. Under an agreement finalised with trade and industry secretary Alistair Darling yesterday, the LDA can use compulsory purchase orders to evict people if necessary.

The agency has secured 93 per cent of the land through negotiation and hopes to obtain the rest through agreement. Occupants of five sites needed urgently will be asked to vacate next month.

The LDA said it is bringing forward£1bn spending on relocation and regeneration costs.

The Times, page 21

WARNING AGAINST MINI MOTOS AS 600 VEHICLES CRUSHED

A police crackdown on mini motos has resulted in 600 of the vehicles being crushed, 90 people arrested and 742 warned about illegal use of the motorbikes.

The police launched a six week campaign in areas of England in the summer, following almost 4,000 complaints about the nuisance caused by the vehicles. Home Office minister Tony McNulty yesterday warned parents against buying children one for Christmas, emphasising that driving the vehicles on roads or paths is illegal.

Trading standards officers have also warned they can be dangerous. Since September 2004 seven children have died in accidents involving mini motos.

The Guardian, page 15

REID DROPS PLANS FOR NEW ID CARD COMPUTER

Home secretary John Reid has abandoned plans for a huge new computer that would hold biometric data for identity cards.

The government originally wanted the national identity register to be built from scratch, to avoid duplication and errors. But procurement was already running a year behind, so Mr Reid has decided to go ahead using infrastructure that already exists. Information will be drawn from existing databases for passports, national insurance and asylum seekers.

But the IT industry remains unconvinced the system will meet the government's objectives.

Financial Times, page 2

A QUARTER OF YOUNG PEOPLE ADMIT TO CRIME

One in four young people under 25 admits to committing a crime in the past year, Home Office research has found.

The Offending, Crime and Justice Survey showed most of the crimes were theft and assault and many were minor. But 13 per cent of those questioned confessed to a serious offence such as burglary, car theft or selling hard drugs.

The findings suggest 2.8 million young people could have committed a crime in the past year. During the period, 4 per cent of people under 25 have been arrested and 1 per cent found guilt and sentenced. Shadow home secretary David Davis said the figures showed the government was failing to tackle youth crime.

The Daily Telegraph, page 2

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