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ROUNDUP OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT STORIES IN THE REGIONAL PRESS - UPDATED 17:35HRS

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NOISE NUISANCE EPIDEMIC SEES JUSTIFIED GRIEVANCES DOUBLE ...
NOISE NUISANCE EPIDEMIC SEES JUSTIFIED GRIEVANCES DOUBLE

A report by the Royal Environmental Health Institute Scotland watchdog reveals that the number of noise-related complaints by feuding neighbours has increased by 50% in the past year, reported Scotland on Sunday (6/6/04, p7). REHIS governing council member John Sleith told the paper: 'Most people are aware of their right to complain, and they do. Increasingly, we are being called on to deal with more and more noise complaints about neighbours.' The REHIS annual report is available here.

NOISE FROM BIG SCREEN TELEVISION DISTRACTS MUSEUM STAFF

Staff at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery are finding he BBC's Big Screen in Chamberlain Square is 'noisy and disruptive', with some workers are finding it impossible to concentrate since the screen went up on 15 May for the Eurovision Song Contest, reports icBirmingham.co.uk. Birmingham Civic Society said: 'It is inappropriate to have such a screen so close to the museum and gallery. The Town Hall is being restored and it does seem that some authorities in the city have taken it as an opportunity to put lots of music and loud noise into that square. There are far better places.' A council spokesperson said: 'It is unfortunate that the test transmission has caused a problem for some council staff. The volume can only be adjusted to on or off and we're working with the BBC to repair this fault.'

FOOTPATH CREATION ORDER IS ONLY WAY COUNCIL COULD OVERCOME BRIDGE OBJECTIONS

Ramblers Association president Janet Street-Porter has criticised Bradford City MDC and North Yorkshire CC for delays to the building of a footbridge in a West Yorkshire village, and blamed opposition from local landowners for the h old-up, reports YorkshirePost.co.uk. West Riding Angling Association, which owns the south river bank and the weir over which the proposed£250,000 bridge will go, has not given permission for building work on its land, and the owner of the north river bank is also against the project. These objections can only be overcome if the councils issue footpath creation orders.

SUNBED USERS GIVEN 'SHOCKINGLY BAD ADVICE' ACCORDING TO REPORT

Sunbed customers are being given 'shockingly bad advice by health clubs and tanning salons, according to a Which? report. An undercover investigation found staff in outlets failing to carry out safety checks, increasing the risk of users damaging their health and developing skin cancer, reported the Yorkshire Post (5/6/04, p5).

COUNCIL DEFENDS D-DAY DECISION TO HONOUR NAZIS' HOMOSEXUAL VICTIMS

Aberdeen City Council defended its decision to fly a gay pride rainbow flag from two of the city's main public buildings on the anniversary of D-Day, to The Herald (5/6/04, p6). The council said the flag was being flown to commemorate the Nazis' gay victims and also mark the city's Pride event.

LITTLE ENCOURAGEMENT FOR PARENTS TO HAVE GREATER INVOLVEMENT IN THEIR CHILDREN'S EDUCATION

The Scottish Parent Teacher Council has told the Scottish parliament's education committee's inquiry into child protection that it believes the disclosure system is not working as intended when it came into operation last year and that delays are being built into the system because unnecessary checks are being requested, reported The Herald (4/6/04, p8). A spokeswoman for the organisation told the paper there was strong anecdotal evidence that, contra to education minister Peter Peacock's aims, parents were now showing reluctance to become involved in school activities, such as helping at fetes.

HACKNEY'S£30M LEISURE CENTRE FACES DEMOLITION

Hackney LBC has admitted an engineering report into its troubled Clissold leisure centre is likely to conclude it will cost more to demolish than make safe, reports thisisLondon.co.uk. Director of regeneration Guy Nicholson said: 'If we are looking at sums of money that equate with the cost of a new centre, we will demolish.' Last December, the centre was closed when water leaked into the electrical plant and although this was only supposed to be until February, the council then had to announce an indefinite closure as more defects were found.

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