Your browser is no longer supported

For the best possible experience using our website we recommend you upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

SECONDARY SCHOOL STAFFING SURVEY - CLARKE

  • Comment
A new survey reveals that there are now more secondary school ...
A new survey reveals that there are now more secondary school

teachers with degrees and that more lessons are taught by teachers

with degrees in their subjects than in 1996. However, the problems in

maths recruitment since the 1990's have not been fully overcome.

The latest 2003 Secondary Schools Curriculum and Staffing Survey -

the last was in 1996 - shows:

- 12% increase in the overall percentage of full time teachers with a

degree

- 8% increase in the overall percentage of subject periods taught by

full time teachers with a degree in these subjects

- 4% increase in the overall percentage of full time teachers

teaching subjects with a degree in these subjects

- No change in the overall percentage of full time teachers teaching

subjects without a post A level qualification in these subjects

- No change in the overall percentage of subject periods taught by

full time teachers without a post A level qualification in these

subjects

- The number of teachers teaching maths without a post A-level in

that subject has risen by 2%

Secretary of state for education Charles Clarke said:

'These results are promising especially considering there are 25,000

more teachers in the classroom since 1997, almost 18,000 of whom are

in secondary schools.

'Ofsted says we have the best generation of teachers ever and the

best generation of Newly Qualified Teachers ever. Our pupils can

expect top quality teaching in the classroom with further improvement

on the way. Change takes time to filter through and I am confident we

are on the right track.

'On maths recruitment, between 1992 and 1998 graduate recruits to

maths teaching courses fell by 34%, but from 1998 to September 2002

graduate recruits to maths rose by 50%. Maths recruitment is a

priority for me and it takes time to turn round but we are getting

there.

'Vacancy rates for maths teachers have fallen by 22% in the past two

years and the latest acceptances to maths PGCE courses are up by 35%

on this time last year.

'A proportion of maths teachers are listed in the Survey as having

'No Qualification' in maths but this doesn't mean they are

unqualified. Most of these teachers are likely to be qualified and

graduates in subjects such as physics and ICT. They may only teach

one or two periods of maths a week.

'But we are not complacent. I am also looking forward to Professor

Adrian Smith's Independent Post 14 Mathematics Inquiry which is due

to be published next month. We are already seeing significant

improvements in recruitment to maths teaching and I am keen to use

Professor Smith's Inquiry to raise standards in maths further.'

General Teacher Numbers:

In January 2003, there were 423,600 full-time equivalent regular

teachers in the maintained schools sector in England, the most for 21

years. This is a rise of 4,000 since January 2002, 13,400 since

January 2001 and an increase of around 25,000 since 1997. That means

the Government's manifesto commitment to recruit 10,000 more teachers

by 2006 has been met - three years early.

There are more Full-time equivalent teachers with QTS than at any

other time since 1984.

Ofsted says we have the best generation of teachers ever, and the

best Newly Qualified Teachers ever.

Continued Recruitment of High Quality Teacher Trainees:

Recruitment to teacher training fell for 8 years in a row from

1992/93, but has now risen for three successive years. And for

2003/04, 14% more graduates have accepted training places than even

last year. In maths, the increase is 35%.

Ofsted says we have the best generation of Newly Qualified Teachers

ever Better Pay for Teachers:

The Government has ended times when teachers were underpaid and

undervalued and the pay of most teachers now provides a good standard

of living around the country. Salaries have risen substantially since

1997 - p ay has increased in real terms by 13%.

  • Comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions.

Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.