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Stoke outlines plans for member cull

  • 2 Comments

Stoke-on-Trent City Council has unveiled plans to cut its councillor headcount from 60 to between 52 and 56, following a review by the Governance Commission.

The cull was one of 14 recommendations outlined by the commission, which was launched by then local government minister John Healey in October 2007.

A report detailing the proposals will be put to a special meeting of full council on 8 September.

The commission’s recommendations, which were accepted by councillors last June, are part of a drive to improve the political system in the city.

The move requires an electoral review by the Boundary Committee, which is now consulting with residents, local organisations, stakeholders and councillors.

Stoke leader, Ross Irving (Con), said: “This is just the first step on a long road towards improving our representation to residents and making sure that the issues that matter to them are dealt with rapidly and properly.

“It is important that people see change happening, and that change is for the better. Adopting the recommendations will be key to ensuring an improved system of governance for Stoke-on-Trent.”

  • 2 Comments

Readers' comments (2)

  • At a time when local government is facing a lot of challenges, this seems a relatively unimportant way of "making sure that the issues that matter to [residents] are dealt with rapidly and properly". Indeed, given that local people still know very little about their local elected members, I wonder if we will not want to experiment soon with much larger numbers of elected members in some areas, to ensure that issues that matter to local people are dealt with "rapdily and properly". If this happens, I suspect that marginal changes like this Stoke proposal will appear as an odd way to spend our time and resources in local government.

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  • At a time when local government is facing a lot of challenges, this seems a relatively unimportant way of "making sure that the issues that matter to [residents] are dealt with rapidly and properly". Indeed, given that local people still know very little about their local elected members, I wonder if we will not want to experiment soon with much larger numbers of elected members in some areas, to ensure that issues that matter to local people are dealt with "rapdily and properly". If this happens, I suspect that marginal changes like this Stoke proposal will appear as an odd way to spend our time and resources in local government.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

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