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SURVEY FINDS BIG DIFFERENCES IN TRANSPORT PATTERNS

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Big differences in the transport patterns for different groups of people in Scotland are shown in a new Scottish ex...
Big differences in the transport patterns for different groups of people in Scotland are shown in a new Scottish executive statistical bulletin, called Household Transport in 1999 and 2000: some Scottish Household Surveyresults. Some of the main findings are listed below.

64 per cent of households had a car. This varied with

- income: from 32 per cent of households with an annual net income of under£5,000 to 98 per cent of those in the 'over£40,000' category;

- social class: 44 per cent of 'unskilled' households had a car, compared with 94 per cent of 'professional' households;

- type of area: 53 per cent of households in large urban areas had a car, compared with 79-80 per cent of those in rural areas.

45 per cent of those who travelled by car or van said they could use public transport.

20 per cent of householders said that their nearest bus stop had at least one bus every 13 minutes This varied with type of area - 36 per cent in large urban areas, 0-3 per cent in rural areas and small towns.

A third of households had a bicycle that adults could use. This varied with social class - from 27 per cent for 'unskilled' households to 60 per cent for 'professional' households.

4.5 per cent of households had more motor vehicles than a year ago. This varied with annual net household income - from 2 per cent in the 'up to£10,000' bands to 7-9 per cent in the 'over£20,000' bands. 4.1 per cent of households had fewer motor vehicles than a year ago. This did not vary much with income (3-4 per cent in each band).

64 per cent of 17+ year olds had a full driving licence. This varied by

- sex: 77 per cent of men and 53 per cent of women;

- age: over three-quarters of 30-49 year olds had a full driving licence, compared with under a third of those aged 17-19 and 80+.

45 per cent of people aged 17+ drove every day. This varied by

- sex: 56 per cent of men, compared with 35 per cent of women;

- age: about three fifths of people aged 30-49, compared with 14 per cent of 17-19 year olds and 8 per cent of those aged 80+.

41 per cent of adults said that they had made a trip of more than a quarter of a mile by foot for pleasure or to keep fit (including walking a dog) in the previous seven days. This varied with sex: 44 per cent of men and 38 per cent of women. Only 4 per cent of adults said that they had cycled for pleasure or to keep fit in the previous seven days. This also varied with sex: 5 per cent of men and 2 per cent of women.

67 per cent of commuters said they travelled to work by car or van (56 per cent as the driver and 11 per cent as a passenger), 14 per cent walked, 12 per cent went by bus, 3 per cent took a train, 2 per cent cycled and 3 per cent used other forms of transport (such as motorcycle or taxi). 62 per cent of men drove to work compared to 50 per cent of women; proportionately more women walked or went by bus compared to men..

Walking was the usual method of travel to school for 55 per cent of pupils, 23 per cent went by bus, 19 per cent by car or van, and 1 per cent cycled. A car or van was used by about a quarter of primary school age pupils but only around one in eight of secondary school age pupils.

Household Transport in 1999 and 2000: some Scottish Household Survey results costs£2, and may be purchased from the Stationery Bookshop, 71 Lothian Road, Edinburgh EH3 9AZ.

SHS interviews from each quarter should produce results which are representative for Scotland as a whole. The survey is also designed to provide results for all 32 local authorities over two years, so a sample is drawn which will produce about 31,000 household interviews spread over two years. Therefore, now that the first 'two year sweep' has been completed, most of the analysis of the results is in terms of the the two years combined. The bulletin provides a few figures on an annual basis or on a quarterly basis.

Minister urges more use of public transport

Almost half of those who travel to work by car could help reduce congestion by using public transport instead, deputy transport minister, Lewis Macdonald said today.

Mr Macdonald was commenting on the findings of the executive's statistical bulletin Household Transport in 1999 and 2000: some Scottish Household Survey results.

The survey, published today, examines transport patterns across Scotland. It shows that 45 per cent of those who travel to work by car could use public transport alternatives. Of those, over half believe the car is more convenient and almost a third simply prefer it to public transport.

Yet congestion in Scotland's main cities is set to increase with traffic growth of 27 per cent forecast over the next 20 years. Eighty per cent of this will occur in Scotland's main commuter areas.

Mr Macdonald said:

'Congestion in Scotland could be reduced significantly if those who could use public transport did so. Current and projected levels of car use are leading to increasing and unsustainable congestion in and around our main cities, and this is bad for our health and bad for business.

'This is why the Scottish executive is tackling congestion by spending record sums of money on modern public transport systems. The executive is committed to building a bigger, better and faster public transport system.

'Nine out of ten Scottish executive transport priorities in the recently published Transport Delivery Report involve improvements to public transport. We need to encourage more and more people who drive to work that public transport is an attractive alternative that will bring substantial benefits to Scotland.'

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