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SURVEY OF ENGLISH HOUSING: TABLES UPDATE 2003-2004

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More than 100 new tables and charts of results from the Survey of English Housing for 2003-04 are published on the ...
More than 100 new tables and charts of results from the Survey of English Housing for 2003-04 are published on the ODPM website today. They are effectively updates of existing tables and can be located along with technical documentation, on the ODPM website.

The updates relate to some (but not all) tables in Sections 1, 2 and 3 and cover cross-tenure topics; new and recently moving households; and owner occupiers.

The new 2003-04 data tables will form part of the main report of the 2003/04 survey. Further table updates for 2003-04 will be published on the web during the coming months.

The main report for 2003-04, which will include a commentary, will this year be published at regular intervals as a series of separate volumes. By producing the survey report in this way, those sections that are ready first can be published without having to wait for the completion of the entire report. Each volume of the report will be made available in both electronic and printed format.

Today's release is not the first set of 2003-04 survey results to be published. Last August, ODPM produced a preliminary bulletin containing some of the key results from the 2003-04 survey as Housing Statistics Summary No 23. This can be found on the ODPM website.

Note

The Survey of English Housing is a continuous ODPM household survey, providing key housing data for all forms of tenure, ie owner occupied plus the social and private rented sectors. In 2003-04 some 20,000 randomly chosen households were interviewed for the survey.

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