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URBANITES BLAMED FOR WASTEFUL LIVING

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Spotlight on sustainable living...
Spotlight on sustainable living

By Jennifer Taylor

Councils must save the environment from wasteful urban lifestyles.

The plea comes in a report by London Remade, a recycling project run by the London Development Agency. It warned that if everyone lived as Londoners do, it would require more than three planet Earths to support them.

London's consumption outstrips its supply of natural resources, according to Making London a Sustainable City: reducing London's ecological footprint.

The report found that the capital's 'ecological footprint' - the area of productive land or sea needed to supply the resources consumed and absorb the waste generated - was more than twice the global

average.

The main contributors are: use of goods and services - 36% - food and its transport - 24% - direct energy consumption - 20% - and personal transport - 14%.

Councils can reduce the city's ecological footprint by clustering homes and activities around transport; using local food in school meals; introducing kerbside collection for recyclables; and increasing the use of renewable energy sources.

jennifer.taylor@emap.com

A Greener Future

Personal transport

>> Cluster homes and activities in accessible locations

>> Create attractive routes for walking and cycling

Food

>> Use local food in school meals

>> Promote farmers' markets and home delivery of fresh produce

Resources

>> Give incentives to produce less waste

>> Provide kerbside collection for recyclables from homes

Energy and the built environment

>> Apply the Ecohomes standard, a method for assessing the environmental impact of house building, to new housing

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