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'VALUE ADDED LEAGUE TABLES' PROVIDE NO ADDED VALUE SAYS UNION

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Commenting on the government's new value added league tables for primary schools*, National Union of Teachers gener...
Commenting on the government's new value added league tables for primary schools*, National Union of Teachers general secretary Doug McAvoy said:

'The government's continuing attachment to performance tables is incomprehensible. Value added tables shuffle the winners and losers without addressing the fundamental flaws behind the tables in the first place.

'A school can receive a glowing inspection report and yet be at the bottom of the tables and suffer as a result. The tables do not tell anyone about the quality of education provided in a school and the 'added value' element does not change that situation.

'The government continues to ignore the fact that in Wales and Scotland there are no league tables and education has not fallen apart. Parents continue to receive good and accurate information about the quality of education in their schools and the progress of their children.'

* Details here.

PRIMARY PERFORMANCE TABLES ARE RAISING TEST RESULTS FOR 11-YEAR OLDS TO THE SAME HIGH STAKES LEVEL AS GCSEs SAYS NAHT

National Association of Head Teachers general secretary David Hart said:

'Primary performance tables still suffer from major defects including heavy reliance on raw scores at Level 4 and now Level 5. They are raising the Key Stage 2 Tests to the same high stakes level as GCSEs. They distort the curriculum to a damaging extent.

'At least the introduction of value added demonstrates the futility of judging schools by the simplistic Level 4 and above criteria. It begins to do justice to those schools serving deprived communities that are traditionally ill served by crude league tables.

'The statistics, showing that a number of local authority results have fallen back this year, only serves to prove that the government's tough target setting agenda has

failed to motivate. Standards will not rise by more and more doses of literacy and numeracy or by greater pressure on school leaders. Only a pr operly funded and genuinely broad and balanced primary curriculum will achieve the aim of higher standards.'

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