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WEATHER RECORDS TUMBLE

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July 2006 was the warmest month on record across the UK, the Met Office has declared today. With the final figures ...
July 2006 was the warmest month on record across the UK, the Met Office has declared today. With the final figures now available, the UK mean daily temperature for the month was 17.8 deg C, breaking the previous record of 17.5 deg C set jointly in July 1983 and August 1995.

Figures for July 2006:

UK mean daily temperature: 17.8 deg C (warmest month on record)

UK mean daytime maximum temperature: 23.1 deg C

UK monthly rainfall: 50.9 mm (73% of the normal monthly figure) UK monthly sunshine: 263 hours (over 50% above the July average)

Many areas saw local and regional temperature records broken in July.

Notably, these include:

* The July 2006 Central England Temperature (CET) at 19.7 deg C,

is the warmest monthly figure in this series which goes back to 1659;

* England experienced its hottest month on record with a mean

temperature of 19.3 deg C;

* England experienced its sunniest month on record with 300.1

hours, beating the previous record of 284 hours in 1957;

* Scotland experienced its hottest month on record with a mean

temperature of 15.6 deg C;

* 36.4 deg C at Wisley in Surrey, the highest July figure recorded

anywhere in the UK;

* A new Welsh record for July became established, as 34.2 deg C

was measured at Penhow near Newport, Wales.

Other European countries are also reporting a record-breaking July.

Notably, Germany has had its hottest ever month, (records date back to 1901) and Denmark has recorded its hottest ever July.

Met Office Hadley Centre scientists are analysing this data to assess the risk of future very hot summers as a result of climate change.

Notes

* The series from the National Climate Information Centre at the

Met Office dates back to 1914

* Figures relate to a running 30-year average, 1971-2000

* Daily mean temperatures are for the 24 hour period 9am-9am (GMT)

* Daytime temperatures relate to the period 9am to 9pm (GMT)

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