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WEMBLEY DEVELOPER SEEKS TO LIMIT POOR RESIDENTS

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The company behind the£1bn redevelopment of Wembley is trying to limit the number of low-income people moving to t...
The company behind the£1bn redevelopment of Wembley is trying to limit the number of low-income people moving to the area, because they won't spend enough in the bars and restaurants, according to The Independent on Sunday (Business, p1).

Quintain Estates and Development plans to build houses, shops, leisure and entertainment facilities around the new Wembley stadium. As part of its outline planning application to Brent LBC, it has promised 38% of houses will be at affordable prices. However, in a letter to the Treasury-sponsored Barker review of housing supply - seen by the newspaper - Quintain spells out why it wants to keep the lid on affordable housing.

Written by the company's property director, Nick Shattock, the letter says 'large numbers of affordable housing tenants, particularly social renters who are predominantly on housing benefit, would not help the economic performance of the restaurants, bars, cafes (and) cinemas in the area'.

Written as Quintain was preparing its application, the letter adds: 'We believe that high levels of affordable housing on mixed-use development are to be avoided and, wherever possible, affordable housing should be targeted at economically-active households'. Quintain - also behind a proposed mixed-use development around the Millennium Dome - said 17% of houses would be set aside for social renting and 21% for key workers.

The affordable housing level falls short of the policies of Brent LBC and the Greater London Authority. Both require 50% of new housing schemes to be affordable properties.
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